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17 days post TT necrosis and hard spot under skin. I need to know what might be happening? (photos)

I am 5'1 120 kids. Went for TT 17 days ago developed brusie below belly button to scar. Bruise went away then TT scar opened one inch wide not to deep. Its nercosis from what I'm told. It looks to be shrinking but I have a saltine crackers size hard spot under skin from necrosis/ insision to belly button and thete is a lump also by belly button.scared and need ideas of what could be happening.and what to look for or do.please help!also have cotton in belly button i t seems to went to close w out it.

Doctor Answers (3)

Necrosis after tummy tuck

+1
I am sorry you are having trouble after your tummy tuck.  This is not a common issue in my practice, but it can happen. Although this looks bad, the end result will be ok.  You may need a small revision of that area to improve the scar, but this should be something that can be done in the office under local anesthesia. 

Make sure your plastic surgeon is seeing you often and directing your care.


Richmond Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Tummy tuck

+1
Kaycordall-

It it not uncommon to have some areas of delayed healing after a tummy tuck. I would just make sure that you have frequent follow up with your plastic surgeon and follow their advice and restrictions. Good luck.

Arun Rao, MD
Tucson Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Tummy Tuck necrosis and hard spot under skin.

+1
Although your concerns are understandable, these areas of delayed healing will go on to heal over the course of the next several weeks. In the meantime, you should be aware that the areas involved may look worse in appearance, before they look better. Important will be continued careful "wound" care ( what you are doing seems very reasonable) and close follow-up with your plastic surgeon. Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 710 reviews

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