I Am Almost 17 and Have Severely Asymmetrical Breasts, What Can I Do?

I am almost 17 and my left breast is an A cup and the other is a C cup. It is very noticeable and the larger one is sagging. They've been uneven for many years and I was told to wait until I finished growing to see if they would even out. It has gotten worse and even of I pad the smaller one it is noticeable. I can no longer wear bathing suits or tight shirts, I need this to be fixed.

Doctor Answers (5)

Asymmetric breasts in a teen

+1

SadSally101: Asymmetry of breasts is very common, however the disproportion which you describe will need surgery to make the breasts more even. At your age, clothing and participation in sports/recreation becomes challenging.  Depending on your state of residence and insurance plan, your breast reduction/lift may be partially covered.  Unless you have been diagnosed with Poland's syndrome (hypoplasia of the breast, undergrowth of the pectoralis major muscle and brachysyndactyly), most insurance plans will not cover breast augmentation of the smaller side.  If you have surgery early, you must accept that results will change with age, pregnancy, menopause, etc. when the larger breast may regrow.  Good luck.


Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

Uneven breasts

+1

Hi,

  Your breasts will not even out.  They must be approached to get symmetry.  If you want to be larger than an A cup, then by definition you need to have an augmentation.  Along with this, you need to have a breast reduction/lift on the larger breast because you are seeing too much tissue on the larger side.  Your nipple probably is lower and larger.

  My approach to this is simple.  Make the larger breast as close to the smaller breast and then hopefully augment with the same size implants underneath the muscle.  If this is not possible to do the reduction to the point of match safely, then go as small as possible toward the smaller breast and then do an asymmetric augmentation.

   You are about  2 1/2 hour procedure from solving this problem.  Whoever is telling you that you will even out is stating the hopeful but not the realistic.  To think that the smaller breast will catch up with the larger at 17 years old is rediculous.

  Seek out your parents input and a reputable breast plastic surgeon (board certified) and see how the options go.  You will be over the top happy when this occurs.

               Steven M. Lynch, M.D.

Steven M. Lynch, MD
Albany Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Breast asymmetry

+1

Your breast will not even out; however, you should wait till your breasts are not growing anymore. Depending on what size you want to be, you may need an implant on the smaller side or implants on both sides +/- lift.  Although your plastic surgeon will try to make you as symmetric as she/he can, you will have some degree of residual asymmetry.  Please visit with a board-certified plastic surgeon to review your options and to discuss possible risks/complications/alternatives.  Good luck to you.

Sugene Kim, MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

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Asymmetric Breasts

+1

It is possible that you may have a congenital breast abnormality.   

I would recommend consultation with 3 board certified plastic surgeons to learn about the cause and treatment of your asymmetry.    

It is something that can be fixed, but may require a revision procedure after you reach full breast maturity or after child bearing.

 

I hope this helps.

 

Dr. Gill

Paul S. Gill, MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Asymmetric Breast

+1

Your asymmetric breast will not even out with time.

However you might be still growing, as far as the breast is concerned, and you may notice more asymmetry.

Once your breast growth is stable, then you can have the asymmetry corrected. At that time a consultation with a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon will be able to discuss all your options that are available to you.

Samir Shureih, MD
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.