I'm 15; Can I Get Porcelain Veneers or Composite Veneers?

I'm 15 turning 16 I'm December and I have a horror ally gummy smile. My gums are much larger than my teeth I feel really embarrassed and self concious of my teeth all the time. I currently have braces on to straighten my teeth but these will not correct my gum issue. I have looked online and have spoken to my mum about porcelain veneers we both think that this is the best option, is there anything I can do now? Composite veneers? Or could I have porcelain veneers fitted now?

Doctor Answers (5)

Porcelain vs.Composite Veneers

+2

I would recommend having a consultation with a periodontist (gum specialist) to evaluate to see what your options are for your gummy smile.  The gums should be treated before having either porcelain or composite veneers placed.  An evaluation should also be made by your orthodontist to assess if your facial bones have completed their growth.  If you have not completed your growth I would recommend the more permanent/ definitive procedure (porcelain veneers) be done after you have completed your growth. 


Beverly Hills Cosmetic Dentist
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Yes and No

+2

The right answer depends on many factors that only your dentist will be able to discuss with you. Yes, you could have composite or porcelain veneers, the "no-prep" kind, where little or no reduction is done to your teeth, but this may not address your concern of a "gummy smile". Most likely, you would need a minor surgical procedure known as a "gum lift" where the gum-line is raised a few millimeters, and in doing so it diminishes the gummy smile look, making the teeth look longer and the gum shorter. After the gum lift, it may be necessary to correct the shape of your teeth with veneers. At 16 years old, you're still a little young to have traditional veneers, but I would strongly suggest you consult with your dentist and a periodontist to see what alternatives are available to you.

Rafael Morales, DDS
Boca Raton Cosmetic Dentist

Wait till you get a little older for Porcelain Veneers

+1

My advice is to wait a few more years before finalizing the esthetics with Porcelain Veneers and gum surgery. While you are still growing, your jaw and gums are also still growing. Also, the longer you wait, the more your nerves will recede and be less likely to be traumatized from the preparations necessary for Porcelain Veneers. If the teeth are absolutely horrible after the braces are removed, you can either have composite bonding with minimal preparation, or you might look into the "Snap-On-Smile" alternative.

Jay Neuhaus, DDS
New York Cosmetic Dentist

You might also like...

Composite veneers or porcelain veneers for 15 year old

+1

Porcelain veneers and anything to do cosmetically with the gums (gummy smile reduction) should really be done after you stop growing.  In my opinion the best option would be composite veneers for the teeth until you are mature enough to have the rest of the cosmetics completed

Leonard Tau, DMD
Philadelphia Cosmetic Dentist
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Gummy Smile, porcelain veneers or composite veneers

+1

That is a great question. One thing we do see reguarly is that the gum tissue does get big and bulky while you are wearing your braces. It often shrinks when the braces are removed and reveals your natural teeth. One thing you might consider is that many dentists can do cosmetic plastic surgery on your gums with a really neat and safe laser. In other words the excess gums are contoured away again revealing your natural teeth.

 

If you posted a photo of your teeth I would be happy to look at it. The key thing is to wai unitl your braces are off and the tissue has healed. You may not need veneers at all, you may just need to expose the teeth with some cosmetic contouring of the gums.

 

Sincerely,

 

Jeff Gray DDS

Jeff C. Gray, DDS
San Diego Cosmetic Dentist
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.