13 Months Post Op - Accidental Blow to Nose. Permanent Damage?

I had revision open septoplasty/rhinoplasty 13 months ago and last night received an accidental blow to the tip of my nose, which was quite painful for about a minute. It seemed to be ok last night, just a little sore. Its now the day after and l woke up with a strong headache and the top of my nose pounding. The nose seems to have maintained its shape. It quite tender and sore. My breathing seems to be ok, but l am concerned that l have done some damage. It hurts when l try to smile.

Doctor Answers (4)

Trauma a year post-op

+1

It is difficult to answer this question without examining you - you should ideally see your plastic surgeon and have him/her examine your nose

Web reference: http://www.seattlerhinoplasty.com/html/index.php

Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 126 reviews

Trauma 13 Months after Rhinoplasty

+1

From your description, it sounds like you hit the nose hard enough to causedamage, whether or not you had previous surgery. Right now, follow the instructions you were given after surgery 13 months ago. Schedule an appointment with your surgeon.

Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Nasal Trauma

+1

After nasal trauma, it is difficult to diagnose the injury on the internet. You need to see a plastic surgeon ASAP for full evaluation and recommendation

Baltimore Plastic Surgeon

Nasal injury after nose job

+1

It sounds as  if you may have sustained a cartilaginous fracture or injury to the columella. There are muscles here that contract with smiling such as the depressor nasii septi muscle. There is probably not much to do other than ice packs. However, you should be examined to ensure that you do not have a septal hematoma which is unlikely but treatable.

Web reference: http://www.bodysculptor.com/rhinoplasty.html

Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.