I Have 10 Year Old Implants and Am a 30G but Have Some Sagging and Would Like Some Advise on Options?

I have 10 year old implants and am a 30G which I do feel is fairly large.. I am now looking for ways I can improve the look with surgery. I am not very keen to have a full uplift as really don't like the look of the scars. Any suggestions would be very helpful. I am based in London. Many thanks

Doctor Answers (5)

Implants in a 30 G-cup

+1

There must be something lost in translation, for a G-cup by US measure is massive, and a 30 (inch?) chest is so small it is before Victoria had a secret. In order to decide what is right for you, you have to sort out if the volume is the right look, and then if the shape or skin envelope up to snuff. Scar or not, if the nipple is low or the breast long and thin sans implant only a lift will improve the shape.


Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

Extra Large Breast Implants and Revision

+1

Without photos, there is no way to give you specific information on what you need. However, in your situation, downsizing, will almost certainly need some degree of skin tightening after the downsizing. Unfortunately, no patients wants additional scars but leaving you with a droopy breast is not a reasonable alternative. 

You should see a board certified plastic surgeon in your area to get a formal opinion through and in-person consultation.

Best of luck,

Vincent Marin, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon

Vincent P. Marin, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Revision of breast augmentation, possible breast lift

+1

If your current bra size is a 30G after augmentation, you have likely had a large-volume breast augmentation.  Large-volume breast augmentations provide excellent volume and shape, but may also result in stretching of the natural breast tissue and accelerated sagging.  If you choose to decrease the size of your implants, you will almost certainly want to also have a breast lift, as the breast tissue will be stretched to a size larger than the down-sized implants.  Although many women are concerned about the scars for breast lift, they can be very subtle in appearance once the scar is fully healed and matured.  The scar around the areola blends in with the color of the areola, the curved scar under the breast hides well in the breast crease, and the vertical scar on the breast usually heals very well and can appear very subtle.  This will result in your breasts being both well sized and well positioned.

 

All the best,

Dr. Skourtis

Mia E. Skourtis, MD
Portland Plastic Surgeon

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Revision of augment

+1
With G cup augment for many years, in all likelihood, if you opt for smaller implants, you will need a lift. There are variations on the lift and you should discuss them, as well as the scarring, with your plastic surgeon. No operation is scar free including the augment itself and most scars go on to fade nicely. I find that patients worry more about lift scars than virtually any other type of scarring and that this is based on preconceptions or seeing immediate postop photos.

Robert L. Kraft, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Breast revision surgery

+1

Thank you for the question. It would be difficult to give a good answer without seeing you. But, in general, there are different way to address your situation. If you want to go smaller, you may need a lift. The type of lift will depend on the amount of excess skin and the size of the implant.

My advice for you is to see a plastic surgeon who has experience in revision breast surgery. You may want to get more than one consultation. Check before and photos. And it is very important that your are clear about what you want and take pictures with you what you want to have. Best wishes.

Moneer Jaibaji, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

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