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I Am 2 1/2 Months Post Op Open Rhinoplasty/Septoplasty. Bump Removed but Still There.

I am 2 1/2 months post op open rhinoplasty/septoplasty. My hump was shaved down but i can still see it and when I touch it is kind of hard. Should I get injections at my next appointment or is this still swelling. It is still tender to touch.

Doctor Answers (10)

21/2 months post-op

+3

Careful, dilute cortisone injections may help, although it certainly appears that it would require

revision surgery to completely get rid of the bump.


New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

Hump after rhinoplasty - nose job

+2

A residual bony hump after rhinoplasty or nose surgery can be frustrating for both patient and surgeon.  Some young patients may have an osteoblastic response to removing a hump and the body may try to regrow bone in the region.  If this area feels hard at  3 months after surgery, chances are you may require a repeat surgery to shave it down.  I would avoid Kenalog injections in this area due to skin thinning in an already thin skinned region.  Wait until the 6 month mark and then decide on a small revision.  

Etai Funk, MD
Houston Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Persistent Dorsal Hump ve Swelling 3 Months Post-op

+2

It does appear that there is a residual dosal hump. Cotisone injections will not help in this area. A revision will probably be necessary, but wait another 6 months so you can determine if the are any other minor irregularities that you want revised at the same time.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

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I Am 2 1/2 Months Post Op Open Rhinoplasty/Septoplasty. Bump Removed but Still There.

+2

Great posted photos! My guess is even at this early date you have a residual "hump" though minor I believe waiting for additional 6 months if still there than a revision or file the hump is in order. But you might be satisfied waiting for full healing than deciding if you are happy. Another thought might be to use a HA filler inferiorly to the hump to elevate the depression and I would do it now to see if this satisfies you at least temporarily. 

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 62 reviews

The nasal hump that came back!

+2

I agree with my colleagues: this looks as if further surgery may be necessary to remove more bone and cartilage.

But, let's take the view that your surgeon knew what he or she was doing and really did remove the bony and cartilaginous hump correctly and adequately. Then this bump represents a collection of scar tissue, probably from a collection of blood under the skin or perhaps periosteal bleeding, and steroid injection into the scar (NOT the skin or thinning is indeed possible) just might have a beneficial effect. If the bump is inadequately-reduced bone, no injection will help.

Bottom line here: if you trust your doctor, he or she is as chagrined by this result as you are. Injection of anything to simply placate an unhappy patient is worthless and a waste of everybody's time and positive energy. However, one thing all of my colleagues and I can agree on is the need to wait at least 6 months and probably a year before re-operation is recommended. You have plenty of time. So, if your surgeon still has your trust and your best interests at heart, I would consider that 2 1/2 months post-op is the proper timing for judicious and conservative steroid injection. Start with a low dose and a weak strength. Re-inject in 2 more months with stronger if needed, or if positive response is seen. Go slow and be conservative, and you may be pleasantly surprised.

Otherwise, re-read my first sentence. Good luck!

Richard H. Tholen, MD, FACS
Minneapolis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 123 reviews

The reappearing nasal hump

+2

The nasal hump in your photo is the nasal bone and will not respond to steroid injections. Makes me wonder too if the bump really was taken down with your surgery. What is there will not go away without revision.

Best of luck,

peterejohnsonmd

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Dorsal hump still there

+2

I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but that bump is not going away.  Injections, time, massages, cream, etc.... will not help.  This looks like bone and that is there to stay.  Swelling that improves with time or injections is usually in the tip or supratip (area just above the tip).  Having said that, I would not recommend a revision right away.  For now, just give it some time and see how much it improves.  But, I just want your expectations to be realistic. 

John Bitner, MD
Salt Lake City Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 35 reviews

Residual hump

+1

It looks like you have a bit of a residual hump.  You should wait at least 6 months or longer to have it revised if it bothers you.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Hump

+1

You need to talk to your surgeon. Some patients will get a significant periosteal thickening after surgery which will feel like a hard bump and take a long time to resolve. This does however make me worry that you still have bone to lower.  I'd wait at least another 6 months before having anything done to be certain that the extent of the problem is fully appreciated.

Michael L. Schwartz, MD
West Palm Beach Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

I Am 2 1/2 Months Post Op Open Rhinoplasty/Septoplasty. Bump Removed but Still There.

+1

From your description and your photos, and without examining your nose I cannot tell for sure, that you still have a bony hump. If this is the case injections will not accomplish anything ,except the risk of thinning your skin and making the problem worse. If this is a bony hump you will require surgery.

 

Michel Siegel, MD

Michel Siegel, MD
Houston Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 78 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.