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1/2 Marathon 6 Weeks After Brachioplasty?

I have been on a wait list for brachioplasty for 9 months now and they finally called to schedule it. Date is 12 March and I have signed up for a 1/2 marathon that happens the 28th of April. I am in good shape and will continue to train. Think I can complete this race as a run/walk in that time frame?

Doctor Answers (9)

1/2 Marathon six weeks after brachioplasty is not a good idea.

+1

A brachioplasty is essentially an upper arm lift. In this procedure, the excess hanging skin and fat in the upper arm is removed. Its the procedure used to correct the common "bat wing" of skin that manifests in patients who have lost a significant amount of weight.   Most of my patients are able to get back to a desk job 5-7 days after surgery.  However, I recommend no heavy lifting or strenuous activity for 3-4 weeks.   If an upper trunk lift is involved, I may recommend holding off working out (heavy lifting/strenuous activity) for 5-6 weeks.  I would recommend you hold off on running a 1/2 marathon just six weeks after your procedure.   Go for the marathon first and then schedule your arm lift.   

Best wishes,

Dr. Basu

Houston, TX


Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 117 reviews

Always best to not rush the healing period.

+1

Although possible, I would strongly argue against it.Why push it? - Tell me "do you feel lucky". My suggestion would be to start training after 6 weeks and wait for another occasion to do your half marathon. Of course the best advice would come from your plastic surgeon.

Larry S. Nichter, MD, MS, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 45 reviews

1/2 Marathon after Arm Lift

+1
  • I would not plan on running a half marathon 6 weeks after your procedure. 
  • Without seeing photos, it is difficult to say how extensive of an operation you will have, but oftentimes at 6 weeks post-operatively there is still some swelling, and strenuous physical activity can make this swelling and associated pain worsen. 
  • Best of luck to you!

Joshua Cooper, MD, FACS
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

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Marathon after arm lift

+1

Probably not a good idea. Check with your doctor. If things looked great I might let you do it if you had compression garment on such as a spandex long sleeve garment.

Gregory Lynam, MD
Richmond Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

1/2 Marathon 6 Weeks After Brachioplasty

+1

   1/2 Marathon 6 Weeks After Brachioplasty would not be advised.  Kenneth Hughes, MD Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 209 reviews

Half-marathon after brachioplasty

+1

This time frame is not recommended and is very close to your procedure.  Vigorous exercise/strenuous activity is typically restricted for 6-8 weeks postoperative.  An activity such as a half-marathon is a very vigorous activity with much use of your arms during running.  The swelling and movement that would ensue would not be good for your overall healing.  I would highly recommend rescheduling your procedure or consider running in a different race later in the year.  Hope that his helps!  Good luck with your decision!

Lewis Albert Andres, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Marathon Seems Unlikely

+1
A half-marathon 6 weeks after a brachioplasty is ill advised. You will have very significant swelling and discomfort.  Not sure why you had to wait 9 months for a procedure, but that is besides the point.  I recommend rescheduling your procedure until after your marathon or running next year.  Best wishes.

Robert F. Centeno, MD, FACS
Fairfax Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 33 reviews

Not a good idea.

+1

 Not a good idea. You will hopefully undergo your arm lift once in your life. The race will be available next year? Best,

 

Gary R Culbertson, MD, FACS

Gary R. Culbertson, MD
Columbia Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

1/2 Marathon 6 Weeks After Brachioplasty?

+1

I would skip that one. Six weeks is the earliest that you would be permitted to do exertional activity of a significant level, and that would leave without ability to train properly, with real risk of injury. All the best 

Jourdan Gottlieb, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.