Laser Liposuction Overview

By RealSelf
Laser Liposuction is a plastic surgery procedure that uses laser energy to treat areas of excess fat and improve contours. Laser liposuction is also called laser-guided liposuction, laser lipo, Smartlipo, and laser-assisted lipolysis.

How Laser Liposuction is Performed  Laser Liposuction uses laser technology to remove excess fat

There are two methods of Laser Liposuction.
The first technique has 3 steps:
  1. The laser is used in the deep fat to break up the fat cell walls allowing the fatty oils to leak out, and disrupt the cells for subsequent removal.  This deep layer also contains small blood vessels which the laser coagulates leading to less bruising post operatively.
  2. The laser is then used in the superficial layer, just under the skin to heat the skin cells in order to stimulate them to produce more collagen and elastin thereby enhancing the skin quality in the post treatment period.
  3. The final step is the removal of the cell fragments and oils and thus the final reduction in contour.
The second technique uses 2 of the above steps:
This technique uses only the first 2 steps above and rather than removing the cell fragments and oils, these components are absorbed by the body. This technique of laser guided liposuction is usually reserved for areas of very thin fat such as the face and neck or where skin tightening alone is all that is required.

Who should consider Laser Liposuction?
When considering Laser Liposuction surgery as an option, the best candidates typically have one or more of the following conditions:
  • Excess fat in mild to moderate amounts
  • Mild to moderate skin laxity
Skin starts loosing collagen and elastin from about age 35.  Resultant skin laxity may not be conducive to liposuction alone.  Other candidates may have superficial problems in the skin such as cellulite, dimpling, scarring from previous surgeries—all of which may be improved by Laser Liposuction.

Liposuction can treat these areas:
  • Abdomen
  • Thighs
  • Knees
  • Arms
  • Neck
  • Face
  • Male Breast Excess
  • Back rolls
Source: RealSelf.com and American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery
 

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