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What do you tell your kids about TT procedure?

  • DnAmommy
  • Dallas, TX
  • 2 years ago

I have 2 kids (5 &7) and I have scheduled my TT with lipo of flanks & inner thighs for 10/19/12. Yay!  But I want to prepare my kids for what to expect but I also don't want EVERYONE at their school, church& the grocery store knowing about my surgery from my kids.  What kind of "phrases" did you use to tell your kids what you were having done and to explain the resulting recovery period?  Thanks in advance!

Comments (10)

My teenagers are used to me having face lifts, lip, etc. over the years. I was very careful when they were young - did not want to scare them. They called me "Mummy Mommy" after facial procedures back then. Now I am two weeks out with my tummy tuck. This time I just told the 15 year-old that the doctor was going to "gut me like a fish." He shrugged and asked what was for supper;)
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I have two boys ages 6 and 3 and I told them exactly what I was having-- a surgery to fix my stomach that got ruined when I was pregnant with them!! The morning of my surgery we wrestled for one last time until I am healed. I told them I was going to be bent over, in pain, and I always made a face at them. but I told them not to worry, and it wouldn't last long and I would be fine. And now 4 weeks later it is. Still no wrestling, and the 3 year old knows I can't pick him up. but they are fine. For a separate procedure I had at the same time as my TT (urethral sling), I have had a catheter for 4 weeks (the sling was too tight-- I am having it repaired tomorrow). The boys can obviously SEE the pee bag. We talk about it. It's no big deal. Honesty is always the best policy with these things, I think. I have also been honest with every person I've met, even strangers. I had 4" separation in my ab muscles and needed them fixed. No one questions it. Who cares what any one else thinks anyways????
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i don't have any good suggestions for younger kids, but I'm a young mom (just turned 37, which I think is still young!) of 2 teenage boys (15 & 18) and i didn't want to tell them what I was doing. so, i said, "I'm having a surgical procedure, no big deal, just a girl thing," and my youngest.sons response was priceless. he stopped me mid-sentence, wide eyed and said, "say no more, I don't want to know" hahaa. I knew it would work!
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Thanks for all the great suggestions! Seems funny that I am more concerned about what to tell my kids versus what to tell my co-workers because I have NO problem lying (half-truth telling) to them! I have yet to tell any "adults" of my plans beyond my husband but my co-workers know I am having surgery but haven't really asked what kind. I do like the "fibroids" and "hernia" reasons so I may have to keep those on deck in case I'm pressed for details.
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My kids are 9 and 6 and I told them I was having surgery to "put things back in place." My 9 year asked more questions so I told him that my back hurt so they were going to make my boobs smaller and while they were doing that they were going to fix my tummy too. He did give me a weird look, but said o.k.. I told him that he didn't need to go around announcing it to everyone. He has since had some questions and I have answered them all and told him that I will be sore and tired. The reason being is that I didn't want my boys to think I was really sick. I have told just about everyone I know that I'm having plastic surgery and they have been very supportive. Sometimes even jealous! I now have a ton a people to call if I need any help.
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I told my two girls that mommy had something in my tummy that needed to be fixed and taken out. They've seen my csections scar so they aren't freaked by my new scar but I would NOT let them see the drains (I had them for 7 days) because I was afraid it would freak them out and they would blab to everyone. It appears they tell some of their friends that I have an "ow-ey" and try and lift my shirt to show them but I think that will stop soon! I've also told people (moms at school) who asked details that I had fibroids removed and they leave it alone and it matches what the kids say on the playground. ;-)
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My boys just turned 10 and I was very honest with them. I told them that skin is like a balloon that has been blown up for a long time and when I lost all of that weight it is like a balloon popping. Sometimes the balloon goes back to the way it was and sometimes it doesn't. Mine didn't so I have extra skin that the doctor can take off. I am telling them that some people may think it is silly so we are only telling people that mom is having surgery on her stomach. Hopefully people will think it is a "female" thing and not ask anything else!

For all others, I am formulating "The Great Lie of 2012". I have just begun to "complain" about some pain in my stomach to people at work (completely fake). I will tell them that I am having hernia surgery. Sad that I have to do that, but I would rather lie than listen to people's crap.
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I have twin boys that are 10. I told them similiar thing and I have been open and honest with everyone neighbors etc. my good friends have seen the aftermath of a twin pregnancy. I have no shame nor do I feel selfish to have this surgery. Mt csrction scar was needed to be revised and my muscle wall totally seperated the entire length as well as I had a skin bib. I told my boys they were worth it but now it's time for mom to get her tummy back to working order :-). I feel the more open you are the less whispers and judgements from ignorant people will come your way.
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Your "fake pain" is pretty hilarious. It might actually work for me though. I've been having some real abdominal pain lately and had to leave work early one day. I can always say they found a hernia and I'm getting it repaired!!
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Ha! I, too, am formulating the great lie. I just don't want people looking at my stomach instead of my face. Not interested in being the local poster child for TT, so private it will remain. However, I do have to figure out what io will tell my children. It will be a developmentally appropriate version of the truth.
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