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How much should I tip my hair stylist?

  • Emmi, NYC
  • 6 years ago

My friend says 15%. I typically tip my hair stylist 10% but that's because the total bill is like $220!

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What does that even mean? Most people have crappy jobs that don't pay enough and don't have health insurance. Most people don't expect to extras in tips on top of expensive styling anyway. I'm a good tipper BTW, I just hate when one employee at a salon wants to act like they are the only one with problems.
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I just hate the bashing going on here about tipping. If you could only run my schedule for one full day, you would clearly understand how tipping is appreciated. It's hard work trying to make people happy all day long. I'm actually very lucky ........i love what i do and i work in a moderate~priced salon. We are very fair to our clients. From the beginning of time certain services have always involved tipping and i truley believe in only tipping according to the satisfaction of the service. If you all would like to recieve tips then stop complaining and go to cosmetology school.
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I don't think there is bashing going on, I think it is just people commenting on tipping percentages & I don't understand the overall comment regarding same. My job involved making many people happy & most jobs people have to pay for their health insurance. My comment was regarding those who do color only, where most r getting 40% of the cost
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I understand your comment better now.
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The salon I go to is upper end & charges $165 just for highlights. (The actual product costs less than $10; I was told that by my sisters friend who is a hairdresser?). That includes having ur hair washed when u r done & does not include having a blow out. It takes less that 10 min to mix; 30-40 min to apply; then u sit & wait while they check on it over a 30-40 min period. Than someone else rinses it out, shampoos. $165. So for less than an hour, even if they only get 40%, that is $66/hr. w/o tip. 15-25% on top of that? It seems a bit outrageous. Blow out $30-40 from someone else. No problem with 20% there or $3-5 for shampoo person. Cut & blow out is $65; again no problem. But the colorist? Come on!!!!!
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I'm a stylist/therapist who listens to people like you all day long ,standing on my feet for 24 yrs. trying to make people happy (unlike yourself). Not an easy job and very tough on the body. Not too many perks in this job either. So enjoy your retirement while we save for ours!
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What color line is your salon using? Do they maintain the integrity of your hair? It took your stylist two years to get to a point where they could do foils that fast. Do you know the proper mix and chemicals for your hair? Tip, or try it at home and see what happens...
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My theory is the more expensive the hair service, the lower the tip. A $12 haircut? Sure, here's $4. A $200 haircut? $15 is more than reasonable. Any hairdresser who expects a $40 tip is out of his/her mind. And you never tip the owner. That is beyond tacky. The whole idea of tipping is just stupid and annoying. Just charge what you think is a fair price for the service and be done with it. And spare me the sob story of how much school and supplies cost.
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I am a bank relationship teller. I excellent customer service, I stand on my feet 8-10 hours a day, but under any circumstances am allowed to accept monetary gifts. Is my job, just as a hair dresser. They make excellent money. More then me. 50-60% commission on a 150.00 service is 75.00 to 85.00 they made of me in 2-3hour service. Not to mention the other customer she ia also working on.
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Being a stylist takes a large amount of training. Skills in color theory, chemistry, anatomy, shape and form. Plus we have to be therapists and mind-readers. Foiling is expensive because it is very skilled and labor intensive. Color in general takes skill and consideration. You work in a bank. People stand in line to interact with you. You count. What do you do to earn tips?
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You count. That woman trained for a few years and has honed her craft.
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Tipping is one common way of expressing gratitude when someone serve you better or you received good service. Most people today pay with either a debit or credit card while buying essentially everything, so plastic is used for tips. There are a number of reasons why one should tip servers with cash at every possible instance. Article source: best short term loans repay installments
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Are you having any luck with these?
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Tipping is an awful tradition. If I'm happy with a good job, I reluctantly tip 20% and usually give a $50 gift at Christmas to hair stylists and manicurists. Otherwise, you get shabby service and a careless attitude can be dangerous. Hair and nails people can do damage to you if you aren't 'generous'.
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So do stylists make non-tip wages comparable to waitresses? My stylist makes more money per hour than I do, but I am still expected to tip. I am a secretary and outreach coordinator for a nonprofit company, but with all of the expectations put on me from clients, they never even consider tipping me. Why do some services get tipped and others don't? Also, waitresses are required to report tips on taxes. Do stylists report them too?
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I stand on my feet 8 hours a day, am expected to give people a great personal experience and I don't get tipped. I sell jewellery and people constantly bargain the price down, and after spending 30min with someone they sometimes walk away. At least hair dressers have a client and a guaranteed sale the minute someone sits in their chair. If we're going to talk about tipping for personal service then everyone in retail who comes in one-on-one contact with a customer should be tipped.
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Well said!
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Are you touching the people you sell to? We deal with dandruff, unwashed hair and bodies, very personal contact. Plus provide conversation (therapy.)
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No trade that requires formal education should require tipping. Hair stylist should charge what they are worth and except (not expect) tips graciously when they are given. Their service cannot be compared to a plumber or a teacher because hair styling is something that is needed on a regular basis, say around every six weeks for many customers. I've used a plumber twice in the last 7 years. Tipping should be the customers choice and not obligation.
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ex·cept - ikˈsept. preposition. Meaning: not including; other than. ac·cept - akˈsept. verb. Meaning: consent to receive (a thing offered).
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Thank you for taking time out to look up those definitions and correct me. :o)
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Anyone looking for a GREAT hairstylist in the Greenville SC area try the new salon "A Good Hiar Day" on Laurens Road. The owner/operator, Brian Watson is the absolute BEST in Greenville!! His phone# at the salon is 864-918-7232. Give him a try, I promise you'll LOVE him and what he can do for your hair!!!
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You can give 5% of the price of hair style.
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Hair stylists, waitresses, cab drivers, are people doing a personal service for you. Plumbers, electricians, and people like that do not have to engage in any kind of conversation except what the job is. I think the difference is the one on one experience that you tip for. That's my opinion of course. I am sure my clients' plumbers don't know as much about them as I do, and plumbers usually make a whole lot more than a stylist. Just sayin. 15% is very good for a tip. Most stylist appreciate anything you give them though.
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