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Is There a "Gold Standard" in How to Do a Facelift and What Questions Should I Ask on Consults?

  • needafaceliftnow45
  • 1 year ago

I read it's important for a p.s. to address the underlying structure/tissue, etc and not to just stretch the skin? Can anyone comment...What are some of the best questions to ask a p.s. on a consult in regard to facelifts?

Comments (9)

Certainly there should be a gold standard for a facelift,but sadly some doctors are just wanting your $$$$,s and they promise the earth,but in reality many do not lift the muscle,they just lift the skin,and that is why people are returning in droves after maybe only two years or less. We can listen to all the promises,but we have no idea what goes on when we are under anesthetic . It does seem that there are many unethical doctors operating now,especially in 3rd World countries and Eastern Europe who are making a fortune by prying on the vulnerable.....how do i know this ! i know because i am one !
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That is the benefit of going to a US Board Certified PS who was trained at a top tier university. I save money when I buy a fur from China, but my face? No no no. I do have a close friend who have the quickie lift. She was so focused on cost that she did not determine exactly what was going to be done. A good surgeon has you sign a patient informed consent that describes exactly the procedure and risks. It is for your protection. Of course you have to read it and discuss it in detail with the surgeon. Why did you go to a third world country for elective surgery? To save money?
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Hi, I would ask the surgeon if you could speak with any of his/her former patients who have undergone the procedure. Most importantly ask him or her how many facelifts he/she has performed and look at the before and after photos that are available. Ask if the surgeon is board certified. The four aforementioned questions are critical. Ask about the surgery, how long will you be under anesthesia, where will the incisions be, are the sutures (internal)absorb-able or nonabsorbable? Ask if the surgery is at the deep plane level. Next, try to get a realistic understanding of the post op period. If you work, I'd set aside at least 3 weeks to heal. I can tell you that even at 3 months post op I would wake up in the morning with mild facial swelling. It would go away before noon. I had numbness in isolated areas for a few months too. The area behind my ears, of course, show signs of having a facelift (incisional scars) even at 7 months post op--so pony tails are not realistic for awhile. I can wear a ponytail now, but have to make sure its not high and tight but lower and loose. Prior to undergoing the surgery I understood the surgery, but for some reason I didnt really think about the pain. The ps gave me pain medicine postoperatively that I used for approx 7-10 days mostly to sleep at night. you will have pain. You will need to ice your face, well the sides of your head mostly, for several days postop as well. Facelifts do hurt, you'll probably eat really soft foods for a couple weeks. It is realistically all about personal motivation toward gaining the end result and the ability to subscribe to the concept of delayed gratification that makes a facelift realistic& gratifying for a patient. I felt normal by 2-3 months, but as I described, I did have facial swelling in the morning. This was gone in about 5 months. I am in my forties and sometimes wonder if I just heal faster or something based on some posts I see here at real self. I dont regret my surgery at all. In fact, if I woke up with my former face, I'd cry. I can tell you that I followed my doctor's postop instructions to the T. I have a very supportive family that took care of me, buying groceries, etc for the first month. For the first 4 weeks I felt like I lived to heal, at 2 months I felt near normal, and at 3 felt great (except for the a.m. swelling). let me know if I can help you any further. Good Luck
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Excellent thatgrl88. Your post is spot on. It hurts, you cannot go out for a month and will feel swelling and numbness for 6 months. Many posts show that a lot of people do not ask enough questions and do not know what they are in for. It is a year of your life. Two weeks of narcotics and looking like you were beaten up. Two more weeks of bruises. 6 months of swelling. I used a wig to cover up my ears and neck. The tightness is uncomfortable. Husband help is important to take over running the house and shopping. I would not even go for a consult if the surgeon was not board certified in PS. No dermatologists! I also like Stanford trained docs, most important is the residency program. Before and after photos and a complete explanation of the entire operation. Any doc who says recovery is less than 6 months is only talking about cosmetic healing. Talk to other people who have had the same surgery.
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I really appreciate the replies.
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Thanks. I really appreciate you sharing your experiences.
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Hi, I wish I had probed more about the actual procedure that will be performed. Some surgeons actually have videos where they describe in detail what they do - mine didn't and I had only the most general idea of what he did. I've had a very rough recovery and I've often wished I knew more about the actual procedure. Ask what precautions he/she will take to avoid injury to the Greater Auricular Nerve. I found out too late that this nerve is very often injured in facelifts and, if it is, numbness may be permanent. Make sure you ask them to define what "recovery" means to them. I interviewed many surgeons and they all told me the same thing: recovery from a mini-lift is two weeks and a full facelift, 6 weeks. I realized afterwards that they were referring to appearance, not the way you feel. It takes minimum 6-12 months to feel anything approaching normal. I'm 5 months post-mini lift and no where near normal yet. If I had known how long & miserable recovery can be, I never would have gone down this long, frustrating road. Even though I look pretty good, I regret this decision every day. If I were advising my best friend I would tell her not to do it; it's simply not worth the constant discomfort and mental anxiety. Anyhow this is just my two cents worth. Good luck in whatever you decide.
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SallieSu2, Thank you very much for your input. That is good to know. I am extremely unhappy with the way my face has aged, but I think I would be more unhappy if I ended u with permanent numbness and for sure if I ended up with disfigurement or chronic pain and other things I have read are possible outcomes. This will be a difficult decision for sure--whether to proceed. It feels like it's sort of a crapshoot, even though the odds can be improved by choosing the best surgeon on can find, but even still there's risk that may not be worth it -- if one can accept the way they age I think that's a better option. I appreciate you sharing your experience. I truly hope you heal fully.
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You know the funny thing is my sagging neck & jowls used to drive me nuts. I came across a picture of myself the other day pre-surgery and I realized I didn't really look all that bad for my age. I bet the same is true for you. Sometimes women can be their own worst critics. Anyhow, hopefully I didn't give you too negative a picture. There are loads of people who have very little trouble recovering after a facelift. If you have realistic expectations about healing time, that's half the battle. Best of luck to you.
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