Are negative reactions to Permanent makeup common?

  • Beauty in Seattle
  • Seattle, WA
  • 7 years ago

Permanent makeup reportedly leads to a high rate of adverse reactions. The US FDA does not regulate tattoo inks, but may soon do so based on patient complaints and the fact the pigments are often unsuitable for humans. Are many people actually having adverse reactions to permanent makeup ink?

Comments (7)

No, bad reactions are not almost all due to one type of tattoo ink. Since the FDA disregards reports of symptoms that assimilate allergic reaction (suggesting that the problem is the patient's immune system and not the product), adverse reactions are under reported for any given ink. Barb said it best that plastic surgeons and so-called artists are not advising of the associated risks of infection and allergic reactions to permanent makeup. I would add to this that some of these artists are whack jobs with stolen portfolios. It is their fantasy that they are skilled and talented artists. Many are not formally trained in permanent makeup and cosmetology but too often have working relationships with plastic surgeons for referrals. They and the plastic surgeons that recommend them are impervious to the harm they cause. When it falls apart, it's physicians, ophthalmologists, and ER doctors that treat infections. In worst cases, infections can persist for years and can spread to internal organs. For cancer patients and burn and accident victims, permanent makeup can be vital to well being. For any real or perceived flaw that can be altered with cosmetics, permanent makeup is an unnecessary procedure not well advised. As promoted for the convenience of permanent coloring and cosmetic enhancement, it is simply not worth the risk. Done incorrectly for esthetic purposes, many tears are cried and can as much hurt you. The same can be said about plastic surgery.
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The New England Medical Journal article was referring to one single brand of permanent cosmetic pigments. The product was discontinued. Reactions to permanent cosmetics are very rare. It is very important to use only pigments from reputable sources. The Society of Permanent Cosmetic Professionals - SPCP - is the largest organization in the permanent makeup industry. The SPCP implemented stringent standards when the allergic reaction ordeal took place and all SPCP approved manufacturers must comply to safety standards. The spcp website is http://www.spcp.org A list of approved pigment suppliers is available there.

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Marleness: I am happy you did not have a bad experience. You are in the minority. The lady I went to also receives recommendations from doctors, she even has one well-know cosmetic surgeon on her website recommending her. How ironic that it is this same cosmetic surgeon that will be doing the laser removal of the bad make-up job the “artist” did to my brows! Please understand that for the most part, these “artists” are ruining others lives. They are not giving the clients complete information about the procedures or what to expect if something goes wrong. I told {edited} specifically to use light colors and stay within the natural brows more than once. Even during the procedure I reminded her to please stay within the natural brows and to make sure to use light colors that would blend with my blond hair. The color was extremely too dark and after 6-months has not faded. She apparently thought since she was an “artist” she knew better than I what I needed. Most of the left brow color is below the brow because she decided to ‘design’ the brow. I hope others will find these and other sites prior to making a very bad decision about having an “artist” disfigure them. Editor note: you must join RealSelf so you can be contacted privately with doctor or clinic recommendations and feedback. This requires free registration for an account. When registering you must opt-in to receiving private contacts (a check box).
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I LOVE my permanent makeup on my lips!!! Can't say enough goo things about it! I first got my lip makeup done about 11 years ago ... This February I had a touch up done by the same person because it had faded over the years... She is a professional--- often her patients are recommended to her from plastic surgeons offices. She sends you to a dentist an hour beforehand.. he gives you injections of novocaine inside the mouth area, just as you would have done before a dental procedure. Then when you are fully numbed she begins her tatooing and she can move quickly and thoroughly without you experiencing ANY discomfort. Yes you do look like a clown for 3 days... But then it starts the flaking off process and by the 5th day--- you look nothing short of gorgeous! I highly recommend this procedure and feel blessed to have found the right person to go to! Like I said--- she is truly a professional in this area... I welcome any questions or comments! And I LOVE the compliments that I get !
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I had my eye liner done 4 times and still have nothing to show for it. My original artist dd it 3 times, she felt bad that nothing would stick so she did it free. No luck, then I decided to go to the man who did my mom's permanent makeup and her definatley shows, still no luck. I guess it just wasnt meant to be.
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I had permanent eyeliner done July 2007, I have had infections since. Eye specialist gave me steroid drops and that only works for awhile...then it comes back. I'm in the process of looking for a Dr. that can remove it. What I have read about the laser surgery scares me, but don't know what else to do. I'm having to wear sunglasses when I do decide to go out. The public should really be aware of how serious this is...I found out the hard way ! TEARS !
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Yeah, but bad reactions to permanent makeup are almost all due to one type of tattoo ink, not every one. The bad reaction inks were recalled years ago (like 2004).
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