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Has Anyone Tried Kor Deep Bleaching?

  • 1Tracy1
  • 1 year ago

Does it work very well? I am thinking about trying it since Nite White 22% failed to give me the results I was looking for. I went to Kor website to find a dentist near me who uses Kor, but neither are using it anymore. Does it still exist? One of the dentists is using another Deep Bleach called Pageant White. I wonder if that's as good. Does it matter what bleach you use or is it all in the way the trays fit? I'm confused!

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I had the KOR Whitening done by Dr. Featherstone in Henderson Nevada and had wonderful results. My teeth were Tetracycline stained quite badly and I never thought anything would work. However, after about two months of whitening off and on at night my teeth are now very bright white. I did not have any trouble with the KOR system and only a very slight amount of sensitivity. My cost was $700 plus I bought some extra product since it took longer than normal due to my dark staining. My smile is now the first thing people notice! I would definitely recommend the KOR system and Dr. Featherstone and his amazingly friendly and professional staff.
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I would like to address your comments. Something is definitely wrong. I am the inventor of the KoR Whitening System and the developer of the products. I have been involved in teeth whitening research since 1977. The vast majority of KoR Whitening cases involve only 2 weeks of at-home whitening, often with an in-office whitening after those 2 weeks. Typically we then recommending maintaining by wearing the whitening tray at home once a month. However, tetracycline stain is an entirely different thing. The KoR Whitening instructions to dentists (in the training materials they receive) informs them that all tetracycline stain cases require an absolute minimum of 4 weeks whitening at home, and that is only for the cases where you can barely even tell there is any tetracycline stain. It goes on to inform that in nearly all tetracycline cases 6 – 8 weeks of at-home whitening is necessary. What that means is that in general, tetracycline cases that are obvious, but not all that bad would be 6 weeks of at-home, and the tetracycline case that are very significant would be 8. If you do not whiten enough at home PRIOR to the in-office procedure, you may have a great looking result, but it will typically regress quite rapidly. And – VERY IMPORTANT – you can NOT make up for it by doing more whitening AFTER the in-office procedure. If the dentist called KoR, my clinical specialists would have informed them that ideally an additional 3+ weeks of at-home would be required, followed by another in-office whitening. You absolutely can NOT make up for not having done enough at-home whitening PRIOR to the in-office whitening by simply having the patient whiten more at home without an additional in-office whitening. However, please do not misunderstand, tetracycline is very difficult. It always has more susceptibility to regress without ongoing maintenance. Until I developed this process, it was considered IMPOSSIBLE to whiten tetracycline teeth at all. And even though we are recognized as the only system in the world effective enough to significantly whiten even tetracycline stained teeth, that does not mean that the system is fortified with “magic”. It does not mean that tetracycline stained patients will have perfectly white teeth after treatment. Historically, nobody was able to offer any hope to tetracycline stained patients. The fact that we now have a system that, when used properly, will always provide a VERY significant improvement is a miracle in itself. Most tetracycline stained patients who’ve been so self-conscious their entire lives that they don’t smile – these people are most frequently very excited with a major improvement. After KoR Whitening tetracycline stained teeth, we do recommend what I have referred to as “Accelerated Maintenance” to help stabilize the color long-term. Dentists are instructed to explain what we call “the Rubber Band Analogy” to their patients. Hopefully your dentist did this. So yes, in the beginning, if you elect to take our recommendation and perform accelerated maintenance, you will go through more whitening gel. Depending on your particular case, you’d whiten between 2 and 5 nights a week for a month, and then decrease one night a week each month. For example, if you start at 3 nights a week for a month, the next month would be 2 nights a week for a month, etc. The more severe the case, the more nights a week you’ll start with. This serves to help “set” the color (as much as tetracycline stain can be set) after the active phase of whitening. In the long term (after Accelerated Maintenance), you will probably maintain two nights, or possibly three nights a month. Each maintenance kit is good for between 7 and 10 nights. The maintenance kits are typically sold for $50-75. So that means that, on average, a tetracycline stain patient may go through a maintenance kit every 3-5 months. So that would mean $10 - $25 per month. Keep in mind that this is after your initial Accelerated Maintenance. As far as the cost of the whitening and maintenance vs. veneers. I am also a pioneer in the field of other areas of cosmetic dentistry, such as bonded porcelain. When placing porcelain veneers to cover tetracycline stained teeth, the process is excessively difficult and requires very, very significant grinding down of the teeth. With tetracycline stained teeth, the deeper you grind into the tooth, the darker the tooth “stump” is (the discoloration is in the dentin of the tooth, not the enamel). Deep grinding of the tooth must be done to create enough thickness of porcelain to mask out the underlying darkness and still look even slightly life-like. Also, you can’t just veneer the six upper front teeth – that looks horrible because you see the dark teeth next to the white teeth when you smile. So you always need to veneer 10-12 teeth on the top and 10-12 teeth on the bottom. If you did 20 teeth, the cost for decent (not even ideal) veneers would be approximately $1,500 per tooth, so would equal $30,000. Any less than that and the dentist would not be able to afford to send the case to a decent lab, and the result would be the toilet bowl opaque veneers that look like horse teeth. Most dentists that are highly trained and use excellent labs charge significantly more than $1,500 per veneer – which could result in a case costing $40,000 for upper and lower veneers. So considering what you would have spent for the original whitening and the Accelerated Maintenance, and the maybe $20 per month long term to have much nicer looking teeth, that’s pretty difficult to say that you could have spent the same amount on porcelain veneers, not to mention the invasiveness of the grinding on your teeth. As far as any sensitivity or discomfort, did your dentist put you on any enhanced desensitizing regimen other than just the once daily application of the desensitizer? In the training we teach various methods to deal with patients who have more sensitivity than normal.
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Hello Dr. Kurthy and thank you for your response, I really appreciate it. I did not realize I would not have been able to just veneer the front teeth, nor did I want to do the grinding in the first place. My dentist and his capable assistant DID instruct me in the areas you mentioned, they did explain the rubber band theory and they did instruct me to use the desensitizer before and after nightly treatment, they also made sure that the mold was not causing the gel to hit my gums. The in office treatment made my teeth look fantastic! But that night I was in excruciating pain. I could not use the gel again until after more than a week while treating myself with a high percentage fluoride gel 30 min. a day given to me by my dentist for the sensitivity. Could that be why it didn't 'set'? As per instructions from your office, after the in office treatment I was given more tubes to use to 'maintain'. Since the treatment worked so well I was not instructed to do any more 7 day a week , only as needed. I can use the at home treatment now with little sensitivity but as I said, 5 nights a week forever is a little daunting. Do you think that eventually the rubber band effect will stop? Give me some hope! Thanks, Ginny
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Another question Dr. Kurthy. If I were to 'start over' and do several more weeks at home plus another in office visit after, could we get better results with no regression?
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Thanks for your comments Ginny! My big concern is that the final in-office visit is entirely dependent on what is accomplished at home. I'm concerned that you only had three weeks of at-home whitening prior to the in-office whitening. That could mean that you'd always have to whiten more at home in the future, and as you said, nobody wants that. As I mentioned, the VAST majority of patients only need just 2 weeks of at-home whitening, but tetracycline stain is in a whole different category. Here is the problem – all molecules are made up of atoms held together by magnetic forces. The electrons have a negative charge and the protons have a positive charge. Molecules that cause color will have certain types of magnetic fields called chromophores. To get rid of the color (and therefor whiten the teeth), those chromophore bonds must be pulled apart – similar to pulling two magnets apart. But the stronger the magnet, the more difficult it is to pull apart….AND the more those magnets want to snap back together when they get very close to each other. It’s the same with tooth stain, and tetracycline has BY FAR the strongest chromophores (magnets). Really thorough cleansing of the teeth, and breaking of the weaker chromophores is accomplished by the at-home whitening, and MUST be done prior to the in-office whitening. This is so the stronger whitening gel used during the in-office whitening can dive in and pull apart those stronger chromophores. The in-office 34% KoR Whitening Dual Activated, Tri-Barrel Hydremide Peroxide is roughly equivalent to 30% hydrogen peroxide. But the at-home 16% Carbamide Peroxide is only equivalent to about 5-6% hydrogen peroxide. So no matter how long you whiten at home, if the peroxide is not strong enough to ever pull apart those remaining STRONG tetracycline chromophores, they will never be pulled apart. Just like a very weak, small woman trying to get a tight lid off a jar of pickles. She can try and try and try, but she’ll NEVER be able to open it. So she gives it to her big, strong husband, and he snaps the lid off immediately. Having done only 3 weeks of whitening at home prior to the in-office whitening is normally just not enough to cleanse enough and break apart the weaker chromophores enough. So when you put that strong peroxide on during the in-office visit, it can’t be as effective. So then if you try to make up for it by using the weaker gel at home, it’s just not strong enough to pull those chromophores far enough apart to prevent them from snapping together again. I hope that makes sense. In my own practice, I personally have my tetracycline patients (with very few exceptions) whiten for 8 weeks prior to the in-office whitening visit, and I don't believe I've ever whitened a tetracycline patient for less than 6 weeks prior to the in-office. We also recommend (only on tetracycline cases) two weeks of nightly whitening immediately after the in-office, or if there is sensitivity, as soon as the patient can wear them. It sounds like you had more sensitivity than normal. The reason for this 2 weeks of nightly whitening is that, even though the at-home peroxide is weaker, it’s still strong enough to continue pulling the chromophores farther apart after the in-office whitening has broken them apart in the first place. And then after that 2 weeks would come the Accelerated Maintenance. As far as the fluoride gel that you were on – no, that would not cause any problem at all. Anyway, I’m hesitant to recommend that you do three more weeks of nightly whitening and then another in-office whitening visit, because you’ve already gone into maintenance. But that would be the most predictable way to ensure that you become as stable as your particular case could be. And of course I’ve never seen your teeth, so I’m at a definite disadvantage there. And it is possible that with Accelerated Maintenance for a few months, you may stabilize. Let’s put it this way – if you continue your at-home Accelerated Maintenance, tapering off one night per week every month, you will not lose what you already accomplished with your original 3 weeks of nightly at-home whitening. In fact, you will actually gain more cleansing and more breaking apart of the weaker chromophores. So at that time, if you’re so unstable that you have to continue whitening a few nights every week to maintain a good level of whiteness, then you could consider maybe two weeks of nightly whitening and another in-office whitening. But remember, then you’d need to do the two weeks of nightly whitening again after the in-office, etc. Also remember that a lot has to do with what level of whiteness your particular case can maintain without a ridiculous amount of maintenance. You may not be able to maintain the “sparkling white” level without more constant maintenance. And really, that’s still OK. Remember, KoR is not “magic”. Our goal is to provide a permanent major improvement – but not necessarily perfect. Given that it used be thought impossible to whiten tetracycline, a major improvement is a miracle in itself. And finally, make sure you have a good photo of what your teeth looked like before the whitening. We all tend to forget how bad things once were. So when you don’t feel your teeth are as sparkling white as you’d ideally want, pick up that photo of what they used to look like. Anyway, thanks so much for all the info, and I hope this has made a big difference in how you feel about your smile!!!
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Absolutely not. Even on "average" color teeth after whitening, there is no such thing as "no regression". There are two reasons for the teeth looking virtually unrealistically white immediately after the in-office whitening: 1) There is chemical dehydration of the enamel. This is not the same thing as evaporative dehydration (drying out). Chemical dehydration is the chemistry of the whitening gel forcing out water from the enamel. When this happens, the teeth reflect light more and temporarily look unnaturally or unrealistically white. The teeth rehydrate over about three days or so. 2) When you whiten (even at-home), peroxide whitening factors (ultra-low molecular weight whitening particles) get into the enamel and create very microscopic bubbles in the enamel. It’s these bubbles that I like to think of as “scrubbing bubbles” that do such a great job of cleansing out much of the stains your teeth have absorbed in the past from foods, etc. But these bubbles also reflect light and make the teeth look more unnaturally white. These bubbles can take about 5 days to finally leave the tooth. I personally think that the initial whiteness looks “fake” and unrealistic. But of course when you’ve had dark teeth and always wanted your teeth to be white, what you want is “paper white”, but that’s just not even possible. And it really does look unnatural. So I like to refer to this as the color “settling down” and looking natural (because after a few days, it IS entirely natural). Hope that helps.
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Hello Dr Kurthy. Thank you so much for your explanation, it makes total sense now. I feel I am making progress since the first post. There's also no doubt I am 'addicted' to the dehydrated look. I will follow your directions and keep you up to date. I DO wish I had been informed of the needed duration of at home whitening before the in office but due to the sensitivity it may not have been feasible. Apparently the person that instructed my dentist on 3 weeks no longer works in your office. It IS a huge improvement and now I don't regret it but obviously following your instructions to the T is crucial. It is good to know that I can do more if I need to and thank you so much for your reply!
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Wow, what a great response! Rock on! \m/
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Hi Dr. Kurthy, I tried to go to your page to ask you a private question, but it doesnt seem that Realself has you set up, so I hope you dont mind if I ask you right here! Several years back a dentist *may* have filled a lateral incisor (? front tooth) with composite. The dentist said this would not lighten. What do you have to say to people with front tooth fillings? :) Crossing fingers, Michelle
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Dr. Kurthy, My dentist offers a take home only version for patients with normal staining (not tetracycline). They charge a reduced rate and I would not get the in office treatments. I spoke with two dentists and they both said that this will work for most patients with normal staining. What is your perspective?
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I am in my early 50's also with tetracycline stained teeth. I had great success after 3 weeks of home and one in office treatment but be aware that #1 if you have sensitive teeth or receding gums and the gel gets in it it will HURT! #2 My whitening regressed after only a few days so the 'maintenance' is becoming quite costly ($50-$100 per month). Add that to the original cost after some time and I could have had veneers. I think I should have been forewarned about the regression. I was under the impression it was permanent or at the very least I would need to do a couple more weeks of at home (information given to my dentist from Kor). I have to say my teeth look great but I don't like the idea of trays in my mouth 4-5 times a week for eternity.
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I had probably one of the most severe cases of tetracycline staining possible. My teeth were a very dark gray. I am a female in my early 50s. I was deeply embarrassed about the color of my teeth and was extremely self conscious about my smile. I began the KoR whitening procedure this past summer. I achieved very noticeable results quickly. I have experienced zero sensitivity with the exception of one somewhat difficult night after an in-office "power" treatment. I managed fine with OTC pain relievers. I have been bleaching regularly for months because of the severe staining I had. I am on a maintenance schedule now, bleaching twice a week instead of nightly. I can say confidently and very honestly, it has changed my life! I have achieved 10-12 shades lighter teeth. I would have been happy with ANY improvement. The total cost for me was $1800. The bleaching gel is expensive at $50/syringe, but it lasts quite a while. It was the best money I ever spent. I highly recommend it. It has been simple, painless and VERY effective. If it worked for me, I am certain it would work on any tetracycline stained teeth. The dentist I used is Dr. Paul Gilreath of Marietta, GA, a suburb of Atlanta. Good luck!
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emartin22 How long did you do the at home whitening before going in for the in office treatment?
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I am Dr. Rod Kurthy. I am the developer of "Deep Bleaching". I have been involved in scientific research and development of teeth whitening since 1977. To answer some of the above questions, there is ONLY ONE true "Deep Bleaching". The only true Deep Bleaching in the world is KoR® Whitening Deep Bleaching. All others are fakes. Our used to be called simply "Deep Bleaching", however many dentists and many companies falsely advertised Deep Bleaching. These Deep Bleaching knock-offs do not at all provide true Deep Bleaching results. It was difficult to protect consumers from this because the USPTO (United States Patent & Trademark Office) would not provide a "Registered" trademark because the name "Deep Bleaching" was "too discriptive of the process". We then came up with the term "KoR", which means virtually nothing. We were therefore able to very quickly get a "Registered" trademark for the name "KoR".

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Hi! I am doing KoR Deep Whitening right now. I am now at Day 7. The protocol is 2 weeks of at-home tray bleaching (carbamide peroxide) and then a two-hour in-office whitening done by the dentist/dental technician. Since my teeth were tetracycline stained (C3 on the shade guide), I may do an additional 2 to 4 weeks with the trays after the in-office bleaching. So far, though, the results have been fantastic and it's only been one week. I can already see a big shade difference. Also, because of the formulation of the whitener and the use of a "desensitizer" on the teeth (used every morning), my teeth have not been at all sensitive to cold or heat. So far, I am very happy and I think after the in-office whitening on 4/11, I will be ecstatic. I've hated my teeth since I was 12 and already I'm starting to like them. My dentist and I are hoping for a nice B1 shade and I think I'm going to get it, which is like a dream come true for me. I was always told only veneers could whiten tetracycline-stained teeth. But KoR does it. I can't imagine why more dentists aren't using KoR but even in Chicago, only a few practices came up when I looked. The one I'm going to is a renowned dental practice that does all the tooth work (veneers, crowns, implants) for the Chicago Blackhawks hockey team (which is a lot of work!) Maybe one of the dentists near you could special order it or could refer you to a dentist who uses it? I haven't heard about Pageant White. Since most dentists take impressions of your teeth for at-home whitening, I think the trays are mostly fitted (mine are). I believe KoR is carbamide peroxide 16%. My trays do seal out saliva and other liquids. Good luck! I know it's hard living with permanently stained teeth--this is like a god-send.
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Just to update: I finished KoR whitening and am now doing upkeep for it. I got to shade A1 (between A1 and B1), which is great considering the color my teeth started out as (C3 and D4). It's really changed my life for the better. I know so many people who have that almost blue-white whitening done to their teeth and I know mine could never do that, but I'm as happy as they are with the A1 to B1 color I have now. I think it's fabulous. Best money spent!
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For deep bleaching of the teeth dentists generally use peroxide based materials that contain bleaching elements. Thus, the discolored teeth are whitened and gives the patient a more confident smile with whiter teeth.
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Here are a couple reviews by community members who tried deep bleaching. Unfortunately they didn't specify what brand though:

“Teeth Whitening (Tried BriteSmile, Deep Bleaching and Tray Whitening) - Amazing!!!"

“Came in for Zoom, but Did Deep Bleaching - Houston”

Also, to try to help with your confusion here is a Q&A that explains deep bleaching:

What is Deep Bleaching?

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