"after" photos of bilateral mastectomy using skin sparing technique

  • sunnidaze317
  • Tallahassee, FL
  • 2 years ago

i have both atypical ductal and lobular hyperplasia in one breast with a family history of breast cancer.  Although aggressive i am leaning toward a bi lateral mastectomy with reconstruction using the skin sparing technique with implants.  However, i cannot find any "post" surgery photos of this technique, and to be quite honest some of the after photos i am seeing on some sites are really scaring me.  Does anyone know of a site that show after photos of this technique.  I am in Tallahassee, Fl. and am leaning toward trying to get a consultation at the Mayo in Jax, hoping they have more experience with the advanced surgery.

Comments (6)

Hi SML,

Thank you for showing your support here in the community.

Stay well and in touch

Beverly

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I have had appts with several plastic surgeons in my area, and have another consult with Moffitt in Tampa. I am still really having a hard time wrapping my head around the "after" photos. I know i am probably being very vain and not giving credit, but i just have to believe plastic surgeons could do a better job with the after-effects of this surgery, especially if you are eligible for the skin sparing. I don't under stand why the scars have to be so large, when i see picture of the keyhole surgery and the surgeon has done the complete job through a fairly small incision. I know this procedure is generally done on smaller breasted-women but a 1/2" scar compared to 5 to 6 inches seems a huge difference.
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Hi Sunni,

How are you? Have you been able to locate a surgeon who can deliver the results you are after? I too saw the horrible after photus while interviewing plastic surgeons. I had the same reaction as you. Remember, a doctor may only discuss options that he/she can provide. Doesn't mean you don't have other options. Don't settle.

Would love to hear from you.

 

Beverly

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I am 38 years old and just had a bi-lateral mastectomy 6 weeks ago at Moffitt. I had DCIS with a strong family history. First let me say that my first thought was not what I was going to look like after the surgery, but was to save my life. That should be your number one concern. You should never believe that your breasts define who you are in any way shape or form. Your health should be your very first concern. The scars are large because they have to scrape all your breast tissue out and it would not be possible to get all the tissue without opening your breasts up completely. The scars fade and can pretty much disappear if use something like Maderma. If you have not had surgery yet, you should really think about getting it done sooner than later. You do not want to have to go through chemo and radiation if you don't have to. The longer you wait, the greater your chances are of having to go through that and it also prolongs your recovery and reconstruction process.
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Hi Sunnidaze,

How are things progressing with you?

Have you chosen your care team? We are here to support you in any way you need.

Looking forward to seeing you here.

Beverly

  • Reply

Hi Sunnidaze,

Welcome to RealSelf's breast reconstruction community. My name is Beverly and I am your hostess (so to speak). I love your name and would like to know it represents your spirit.

We have many photos on the site but none are tagged specifically as skin sparing. However, most of the trams, DIEP and those that involve using expanders will have been skin sparing.

I would suggest posting a question in the Q&A forum for the doctors and you will likely get a number of responses.

When you begin interviewing surgeons they should be able to provide you with patient photos. You will want to have confidence about your expectations. Discuss this with your surgeon and make sure all your concerns are addressed. It is also prudent Ito partner your oncologic and plastic surgeon as they will work in tandem with you to provide you with the best possible outcome.

Please feel free to ask here if you have other questions and concerns. Many of us have been through the process and are happy to guide you through your experience as best we can. 

Take care,

Beverly

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