Face lifting with Ultrasound on Dr. Oz

mellieb on 10 Nov 2010 at 9:04am

What’s the latest news in non-surgical facelifts? Well, you’ll have to tune into the Dr. Oz show on Thursday, November 11 to get the whole scoop…but here’s a sneak preview.

Ultherapy by Ulthera System

When asked, most people say facelift surgery is their last resort to sagging facial features. This is why each year there are multi-billion dollar sales of skin creams and skin tightening treatments. But can you achieve meaningful face lifting and firming without surgery? 

Dr. Oz's show will demo a new device offered at select doctor offices and skin clinics, called the Ulthera System, which delivers ultrasound energy to sagging skin areas. This energy is mean to stimulate skin-tightening and firming.  Clinical trials suggest that treatments do help:

Clinical trial results from Ulthera System use in treating male jowls

 

Ulthera and the Ultherapy procedure allows a clinician to view ultrasound images of skin tissue in order to provide a more targeted treatment. 

During a typical 30-minute Ultherapy treatment session, an ultrasound applicator is passed over each region of the face. The sound waves emitted deliver small, controlled amounts of energy into the deep layers of skin and soft tissue. Yes, this is likely painful during the treatment time!

Ultherapy on RealSelf

Although there are only three reviews of Ultherapy to date on RealSelf.com, it received two Worth It thumbs up, and one Not Sure.

Says contributor Lorrielou, “I would recommend this treatment to others - not invasive and there is absolutely zero downtime - but there is pain during the treatment.” Contributor 5406Anon adds, “You can have the procedure done in the morning and go out that evening…I saw immediate results that only kept getting better over the next 3 months.”

Dr. Leonard Gray, San Francisco plastic surgeon, believes Ulthera is effective, noting, “In my experience, the Ulthera machine works much better at non surgical skin tightening.”  

Craving more information?

Tune in on Thursday, when Dr. Haideh Hirmand, a New York plastic surgeon, will share his expert insights on Ultherapy with Dr. Oz. Find out when the show airs in your city here

More on RealSelf

Comments (7)

please send me a details of price qnd how to buy, Im in Thailand. Thanks
  • Reply
I thought it might be helpful to clarify how this machine works.
The Ulthera device does not heat the dermis directly at all, except when sound waves are reflected off of bone. All the heat occurs several mm below the surface of the skin, with the depth depending on the transducer head. That is why it has an Ultrasound Imager built it- so that we can "see and treat" the target layers. The longer wavelength transducer heads treats the deeper tissues, and the shorter wavelength transducer treats more superficially. We can see the layers of tissues below the surface with the built in ultrasound imager, and the device tells us how many mm deep that tissue is. We can then choose the right transducer attachment to treat the right tissue layer to get the 'shrink wrap effect' we want.

Another consideration is that sound waves will reflect or 'bounce' off bone, for example over the forehead. The sound waves can then get refocused, just like light reflecting off a mirror. That is the only time that the dermis (skin) might be directly involved in the process of heating. For the most part, the Ulthera device heats up tissues deep to the surface, and only heats the skin indirectly in certain areas, only by reflection.
-Claudio DeLorenzi MD FRCS
  • Reply
toilet paper machine
balloon machine
toilet paper machine
Eva machine
oil pressure foaming machine
foam cutting machine
balloons printing machine
balloon machine
Balloon dipping line
Glove dipping machine
Latex glove machine
Condom machine
Tissue machine
Tissue Paper Machine
kneader machine
balloon screen printing machine
Glove knitting machine
Balloon printing machines
Latex glove machine
Facial tissue machine
napkin machine
Baby diaper production line
Eva foaming
  • Reply
toilet paper machine
balloon machine
toilet paper machine
Eva machine
oil pressure foaming machine
foam cutting machine
balloons printing machine
balloon machine
Balloon dipping line
Glove dipping machine
Latex glove machine
Condom machine
Tissue machine
Tissue Paper Machine
kneader machine
balloon screen printing machine
Glove knitting machine
Balloon printing machines
Latex glove machine
Facial tissue machine
napkin machine
Baby diaper production line
Eva foaming
  • Reply
I have had this system for over one year at my clinics. It is very uncomfortable for patients- I had it done myself, so I know what it feels like! Your mileage may vary, but on the whole, Ulthera Tx does provide valid options for selected patients (not useful on heavy, fatty faces!).
BTW, I did invest in Thermage too when it first came out, but I got rid of that machine after about 6 months because it did not work for the majority of my patients. I am keeping this machine because it works. My only complaint is that the transducer costs are still too high. The high prices mean that I cannot lower the price of the procedure to where it should be priced. The results are highly dependent on the number of pulses patients receive, the fluence, and the type of skin. If you don't get enough 'lines' of treatment, you will not see a result. We find that we need to give at least 350 lines of treatment at maximum recommended energy levels (on average) to get a visible result on the face. It must be used in the right patient- it is not appropriate for everyone.
//Claudio DeLorenzi MD FRCS
  • Reply

Ultherapy sounds a lot like Thermage, and Oprah featured Thermage on her show a few years ago.  Thermage had a lot of early hype, yet even the doctors that use it now say the initial version didn't work well.  Is Ultherapy 1.0 ready for prime time, or should people seeking non-invasive facial rejuvenation wait for version 2.0?

  • Reply
Ultherapy is very much like Thermage in terms of what the technology is trying to accomplish which is to non-invasively stimulate and remodel collagen by heating the dermis. The difference between the two technologies is that Thermage is very inprecise in energy delivery. There is simply no way to quantify the exact amount of energy applied. Ultherapy allows the operator to target the depth and amount of energy very precisely.

The concept of heating the dermis to stimulate new collagen production is effective. When Thermage works, it works very well. It is not difficult to find extremely happy patients. Unfortunately, patient surveys suggest this only represents about 30-40% of the treatment group. This is the reason that you find many physicians who have gotten rid of their devices. Satisfaction with Ultherapy appears to be about 80-85% with one treatment and if non-responders are retreated, satisfaction may approach 95-100%.

We have had the device for about 6 months and are now starting to see patients back. Our results mirror the published studies. We have had a few non-responders but generally results have been good. As we are learning how to get the best results, we have guaranteed the procedure. If our patients are not satisfied, we will retreat them at no cost. So far, I have retreated 2 patients.

Should patients wait? No. There do not appear to be any issues with the device itself. As with any procedure, however, there is a learning curve. As physicians obtain experience, I have no doubt that outcomes will improve. That is the reason I think all patients should have a frank discussion about what happens if they do not obtain good results.
  • Reply