New skin resurfacing technology: ActiveFX laser

Beauty in Seattle on 15 Jul 2006 at 5:34pm

FraxelI just coerced my friend Denise to writeup her positive Fraxel laser results which inspired me to investigate new facial resurfacing and skin renewal options. In this research I ran across a new "fractional" laser system called ActiveFX.

Sounds very similar to Fraxel (See Fraxel laser reviews on RealSelf), where a laser is used to stimulate collagen growth.

In the press release about ActiveFX, they feature a provider of the treatment, Dr. James Heinrich, an Orange Country facial plastic surgeon.  Dr. Heinrich refers to his findings that your entire face can be treated in 30 minutes but the downtime is meaningful: 4 days. Takes more than 4 or 5 sessions. {Update: Company states takes 1 session}

Intriguing bit about the long-term effectiveness. The doctor states that "With proper care to avoid the harmful effects of sunlight, the improvement can last for several years." Not sure how he knows this with such a new technology but perhaps he can estimate the duration of effects based on how much new collagen growth is stimulated by the Active FX sessions. Pure speculation.

If you've undergone ActiveFX skin treatment sessions, please do share your experience (especially if it was a year ago!). In the meantime, here's a before & after picture sent to me by lumenis.

Comments (127)

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Had the Active dx and Deep FX done at the same time. I am 63 and am hoping for a fresher look and maybe a few lines around lips and eyes to be better. It has been 2 days and it is going just like it should. My Dr said to soak face in 1 T vinegar and 1 cup of water for 15 minutes at a time. That helped with the burning. I can also us 1/2 water and 1/2 3% peroxide to help with the healing. Of course I am to keep my face moist. Good luck!
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I've got an special May half pice discount at the Miami Institute in Four Seasons Miami. So far so good. Dr Galo was very gently. It was a little painful in some areas but not that bad.. The procedure happened a few hours ago.. I still feel a slightly disconfort and redness. I'm trying to follow carefully every instruction I received. Ice, Hydrocone, valacyclovir to prevent infections.I hope results to be awesome!!!
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Con, I hope you are feeling better. Did the doctor give you specific instructions for the first 5 to 7 days after the procedure? You may want to start using Cetafil on your face to cleanse.. I did not use water on the face except to mist with Avenu mineral water for the first few days after the procedure, additionally I used Neocutis moisturizer after cleansing. Today, is 3 months since my procedure and I am more pleased than ever.
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I had Active FX done yesterday sat27th march,I could not see right for about 15 min,I would not have been able to drive myself home.My husband nearly cry when he seen me, People allways told me i looked good for my age.I hope i did the right thing having this done, when i got home i got the jar of vaseline and cover my face and neck got peas outof the freezer and put them over my face,I did,ent feel any better,I took 2 pain killer and a sleeping tab. Got good night sleep woke up with my face on fire,took all the vaseline off and wash my face with cold water,put the vaseline back on i feel like i am after been in a fire,I have just put a wet face cloth in the freezer going to try that.If i had seen this page before i would not have had this done,At the moment i look like i fell asleep in the sun my face is tight my eyes are swollen i can,t waith for thur i was told 4 to 5 days i would b ok,would love to hear from anybody that has just had it done,will keep in touch every day to let u know how i getting on have to do something now my face is burning ,cm
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I had the Active FX Procedure performed on December 30th, to remove fine lines under my eyes and on eyelids. The doctor recommended I have the entire face done to avoid mismatching of skin tone. I took her advice and she perfomred the procedure in about 20 to 30 minutes. It has been 4 days now and I am absolutely thrilled with my results. The lines under the eyes are gone as are those on my eyelids. Additionally, the skin tone on my entire face has improved. So far, I am very pleased with my results and would recommend the procedure to anyone wanting to remove fine lines around the eyes.
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Can anyone recommend who does the Active FX procedure best in the Baltimore area? I want to be sure I do this correctly and select the best doctor.
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Hi Maw -- Here's a list of Active FX doctors in the Baltimore area: Baltimore Active FX

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I had active FX on my hands day before yesterday, and the pain was excruciating. Still have much pain on my hands. I will not repeat the procedure, even though the doc recommends it.
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I am a 71 year old male who works out daily in the gym. Good for the body but what about the face? Three years ago I had a Thermage. Then 14 months ago (Feb 2008) I had an Active FX. Now I have a smooth face that is ageless. I recommend the $3000 Active FX highly because it does obviously last for years.
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I had Total Deep Fx done in Nov. 2008. 3 months out from procedure I would say that overall improvement to my acne scars are maybe 20%. I was hoping for much more improvement, and feel disappointed so far. I doubt if in the next 3 months at the 6 months post-procedure point I will see much more than a 5% improvement. Very costly procedure for minimal results. Yes, I can have it repeated again, but not sure I will do that.
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What type of acne scars did you or do you still have? Did you take any before and after pictures?
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I'm with you. I think the results are extremely minimal and definitely not worth the cost or downtime involved. I also was expecting a lot more improvement, especially after my consultation and the doctor describing what and how much he could improve my skin. It has been 6 weeks for me and still only very minimal improvement.
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I had the total fx done on January 30th for some pigmentation problems and some ice pick scars(I believe that's what they are). Today is day 6. I am still a little swollen, but the pigment areas are lighter (after the skin peeled)but still there. The scarring seemed like there were results, but only due to the swelling. As the swelling has gotten better, the tiny holes, that I call scars are still apparent. Not happy at this point, cause the healing process and the after care sucks. Another thing, from all the pics I have seen, most areas that have had the deep fx, have more of a scabbing going on, because it goes deeper, sometimes to the blood supply, that's why there are specks of dried blood afterwards. I had none of that. It was all uniform and red...no problem areas seemed to be treated with the deep fx(the pitting on my cheeks), so I don't even know if he did it or not. I was so out of it, because of all the meds they gave me( 2 Ativan, 1 Percocet and some Versed, plus the shots in my gums).I don't remember anything about the procedure and woke up in my bed at 3:30a.m. I think the meds they gave me were overkill and it bothers me to not remember even leaving there.I go back tomorrow for my 1 week follow up appt. He mentioned during the consult(in November) that if something needed re treated he would do it at no charge. But they sell this treatment as only needing 1. The scarring, I can see maybe needing more than 1, but not for the pigment issues (brown spot on cheek and some freckles) they should have been gone after the peeling, but they are still there(lighter, but still there none the less). I did months of research on this, and finally decided to have it done. It has only been 6 days,I know the collagen rebuilding takes up to 6 months, but the texture and scar improvement should be kind of an obvious and permanent thing once the face peels.I am curious to see what the doctor says tomorrow.
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I am 40 yrs. old, fair skin, blue eyes and fit. I spent many years in FL and CA, and while for the most part I didn't sunbathe very often, I also went about most of my life without sunscreen. I do not, and have never smoked. I get botox in my forehead for the horizontal creases, although I never do the glabella (sp?) --I like to be able to frown at my kids!! ha. I have been annoyed with the dark circles and lines under my eyes for a few years. Always look tired and older than I ought to. Went for a consult once for blepharoplasty and the PS said no. Had restylene injected under the eyes in '06, and while it plumped them up nicely, it created a weirdly bluish cast whenever I was lit from overhead (most of the time--ugh!). That lasted a year. I had Active FX on my face on 11/06/08, to minimize crows feet, fine lines under the eyes and brown/sun spots all over. We debated whether or not use the eye shields and go right up to the lash line, but I chickened out. The doc suggested perhaps I could get improvement without going very close to the lashes. He said we could go back and do just the eyes later for free if I wanted. Overall results are FANTASTIC!!! I LOVE IT. I was out in public on the 5th day--still a bit pink, but no one noticed. I started using Mineral makeup and within a week felt that my skin was too dry. Not sure if it was the makeup or the procedure. At 2 weeks went back to my usual make up. Within 6 weeks everyone has been complimenting my skin--even people who don't know I had the procedure and people who have never met me before. Very cool. I have NEVER had anyone compliment my skin in my life. Also, I traveled overseas at about 8 weeks, and I had at least 3 comments by officials checking my passport that they were shocked by my birthdate. Yay! However, due to avoiding the eye lid area, the lines there looked more pronounced than ever iin comparison with the rest of my face. So I went back yesterday 1/8/09 to have the eyes done, and also decided to do the neck ( I am slim and have loose skin "turkey neck", and the chest. My chest has extreme sun damage from sun poisoning when I was 14--many dark spots (as large as pencil erasers and freckling), as well as deep lines/wrinkles uncharacteristic of the rest of my skin. Doc had me use hydroquinone (Obagi) twice daily before both procedures to minimize or eliminate post-treatment dark spots. I could not tolerate the cream on my neck or chest--severe outbreak, but no problems on the face. 1 month after the first procedure, doc recommended using the Obagi once daily, ongoing to prevent future darkening. Also, of course, use sunscreen all the time (I am not good at that) BTW, if anyone can recommend a brand of sunscreen that is not greasy I would appreciate it! I took Valtrex for the face procedure, but not for the eyes/neck/chest. I went in 90 min. early for both procedures; they gave me Ativan and Vicodin. The procedure on the face HURT A LOT! They gave me another Ativan about halfway in. True it only took 30 minutes, but it was a stressful 30 minutes. I had to ask for several breaks. Yesterday, they gave me both Ativan, 30 minutes apart before starting the procedure. It was still painful around the eyelids, but not nearly as bad as the first time. The neck and chest were a piece of cake. They turn the laser way down, and evidently you don't feel as much there anyway. From this 2nd procedure, I am hoping that my eyes will look as good as the rest of my facial skin. Also I hope it will reduce/remove the pigmentation & wrinkles on my chest, and I hope to get a good amount of tightening of my turkey neck, although I know it won't be as good as a neck lift would be. But a neck lift is $8K with significant downtime, and DH is not inclined to pay for it now. ha! I keep reminding him of the importance of maintenance, to which he rolls his eyes. After both procedures, the skin burned like a severe sunburn for about 90 minutes. The docs office gave me a lovely tube that blows cold air, and when I went home I lay down with a cold air blower aimed at my face. Both times I fell asleep quickly and woke later without any burning sensation. I was told to use Cetaphil to wash gently (it burns to wash the first day or so), pat dry, and use Elta gel the first day and Elta lotion for the rest of the days. I did not care for the Elta lotion--felt like it caused burning, and on the 3rd day tried my own creams "Soothe" by Rodan & Fields, and MD Forte Replenish Hydrating Cream. Doc said it was ok to use my creams. After my first procedure, I used a wet wash cloth & Cetaphil on the 3rd evening and 4th and 5th days to gently buff off the peelies in small circular motions. I think technically you are not supposed to do this. Ahem. But anyway I did. I did not experience any adverse affects, but this is not to say someone else wouldn't. Take your doc's advice over mine, please! Anyway, I was very pleased with this procedure the first time, and hope to be pleased this second time too. BTW, I paid $2000 for the face (products included). This was as a sample patient, and doc said he would be charging about $5k for it in general. However, not sure after reading here that I really got a good deal. $1500 for neck and chest. Eyes were free. Even if I didn't get as great a discount as I thought, I am VERY pleased so far with results. Best of luck to all here. Blessings!
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I had the Deep FX and Active FX procedure done on Wednesday Nov 19. It has been 6 days since the procedure and I can already see improvements. My focus was primarily on the scars on my cheeks and some bumps I had around my mouth. My face was very red the day after the procedure but I wasn't too swollen. I was scared to look in the mirror because of all the tiny red (blood) spots. Thankfully they went away the morning after the procedure. I applied the Aquaphor and another prescription topical ointment(only applied on the 1,2 &3rd night) that was given to me by my doctor. Prior to the procedure I did a lot of research and was for the most part, prepared for what I was getting myself into. I will say though, I did not peel nearly as much as expected. I believe this was in part due to the cream and aquaphor. My only complaint would be that the aquaphor is so heavy and greasy that it made me breakout! I have several bumps on my cheeks now, but once they go away, i will be happy! :) Acne scars are about 75% gone on my cheeks! HOORAY! I didn't have any wrinkles that I wanted to rid, but my face is much tighter! The bumps around my mouth are about 60% diminished. I've heard that the full effect of the procedure can be seen for up to several months after the procedure so I hope it all gets better! Best of luck to anyone who is seeking to have the Deep FX or Active FX done. I'm glad we have forums like this to encourage one another & to give reassurance that we are not alone in our skin frustration. ;) Happy Holidays!
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Happy2be - I am happy you got good results. I am curious to know what type of scaring you had on your cheek and how deep. I am having deep fx done next week on two scars on my cheek and would be thrilled to get 75% improvement.
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Wow, after reading EVERY email posted on this site, the good, the bad, and the ugly associated with Deep FX Fractional that I am scheduled to have done this Friday at 8:00 a.m., I don't know if I should cancel and lose the $ I have paid down on the procedure, or trust the process and the practitioner that this procedure will improve my overall acne scars and wrinkles. I am 49, fair, and in good shape, so my expectations are reasonable. I have had a couple facial procedures done, and I have now learned to expect the very worst for swelling, discomfort and healing time. I have been working hard to prepare myself for the worst this can be in terms of down time and misery, yet hoping I will be wrong this time. But in case I'm not, I am ready for FX Fractional bootcamp. I will come back and keep you all posted on my HONEST experience as I journey through the healing process over the next many months. Wish me luck.
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I had ActiveFX back in March of this year and it took 4 days for the brown spots to disappear. By then I was completely presentable in public. I noticed my skin looked brighter and nicer, but was surprised by the positive comments from other people who did not know I'd had anything done. I never expected to notice the longer-term effects of collagen building, but after about 4 months I noticed that the skin under my left eye, which was treated more aggressively than the skin under the right eye due to more brown spots, was plumper. My eyes are rather deep set and the skin underneath is so thin that the pores are visible as little white dots. These pores were also less visible beneath the left eye after 4 months. I was really surprised by this. I just had a second procedure yesterday because I am now a firm believer in the collagen building that results. Aside from that, after the first procedure I was also able to reduce the amount of foundation I used because my skin was much more uniform in color. Overall, I am very happy with the results, although the healing process is rather uncomfortable and a little scary since I thought those spots would never go away. I am 41 years old and have fair skin.
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Fractional CO2 and Fraxel comparison I'm a 47 y.o. business owner who is in the public and tries to stay ahead of Father Time. In late January 2008, I started a series of Fraxel (Reliant) treatments to dial back a few years for minor crows feet, some enlarged pores and some dark spots from my youth in the sun. After three treatments ($1100 each) and realististic expectations from a PS that I've been going to for 10 years, I saw minimal results after 4 months. A 20% improvement - similar to dermabrasion or a chemical peel - but not $4000 woth...In fact, I saw some hyperpigmentation and dark circles that hadn't previously been evident. Granted, the results would have improved over time, I'm sure, but when offered the choice of going fractional CO2 for my final treatment - for the same money - I jumped on the chance. The pain varied on each of the three Fraxel procedures - my thoughts are that the pain level was dependant on my menstrual cycle and length of time of the lidocaine application (The most painful Fraxel was the pain my period started - but this is anecdotal Last week, I had a Fractional CO2 (Deka Technologies) and frankly, already see a change after 5 days. My PS prescribed a round of Prednisolone 4MG - a steriod - (Sandoz) which TOTALLY minimized swelling (though I did have some insomnia). I would SO recommend a dose pack - my swelling was so mitigated with the steriods. I actually went back to work the next day - looking pretty scary - but I'm the boss and had coached my staff to say "I can't tell you've had anything done." I used Epidermal Repair (SkinCeuticals $65/tube) the first day every hour, alternating with small ice packs (Juvenderm ice packs) and used Aquaphor at night every few hours. The third day, I stayed home - my eyes were a little swollen and I was peeling exuberantly so thought it best to work from the house. Truth is - I know that Fraxel is supposed to be minimal down time with maximum results - but I wish I'd saved $3000 and gone straight to the Fractional C02 - even with the redness I have. Best advice I can give: 1. Forget the expensive lotions and potions - Aquaphor was much more soothing at $4.99 for 1.75 oz that Epidermal Repair at $65/ oz. 2. Get a Medrol Dose pack (or similar steriod). My swelling was pronounced with the Co2 - but managable and not as uncomfortable as one of the Fraxel treatments. 3. If wrinkle / aging is a concern, talk to your doctor about the overall benefits of Fraxel vs. CO2. For the money (even given the few days of down time) I wish I'd done CO2. 4. Moisturize like crazy with Aquaphor or something similar ( also used Johnson & Johnson's Creme Emolliant - similar Glycerin / Mineral Oil consistency. 5. If you're uncomfortable (form a pain standpoint) with any laser procedure, ask for more Lidocaine time - even if it means stopping the procedure an reapplying, My last procedure was done by a Medical Technologist who rushed the one our recommended Lidocaine prep time to about 50 minutes. I'm a tough cookie - but after jumping out of my skin, I told him that I was not comfortable proceding until he reapplied under my eyes and waited a full 15 minutes. Made all the difference in the world. Don't be afraid to speak up! 6. Be realistic about your results. I asked ALOT of questions - and although I read the posts here - my main research was done from clinical white papers in peer reviewed physician journals (available on-line, sometimes for a small fee) and mosy importantly, my surgeon. Admittedly, I'm pretty educated about basic medical concepts from my business (I have been on the business side of medicine for 20 years), I still researched like crazy first. 7. Take posts here with a grain of salt. Most patients who are thrilled with their results won't post the good stuff. It's human nagture to complain more than compliment. As an example - if you're reading my post, are you considering a laser procedure and looking for information? My guess is that the answer for 75% of us is - yes... Ok. That's it. Thanks to all who posted before and gave me information which was helpful. Hope this helps someone. :) p.s.the best laser article I read is below: What Is a Laser & How Does It Work? What Is Laser Resurfacing? Available Types Of Lasers Are You a Candidate For Laser Resurfacing? What to Expect At Your Consultation Preparing For Your Surgery How Laser Resurfacing Is Performed The Long Road to Recovery Risks and Complications Frequently Asked Questions About Laser Resurfacing The Least You Need to Know Related Links References Join Us on the Facial Plastic Surgery Message Board! RECOMMENDED! -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Lasers: Uncovering Younger Looking Skin Lasers are used to help uncover the fresher, younger looking skin that we never knew we had. They allow us to remove the sun damaged, wrinkled and dull upper layers so that when you are fully healed all that remains is a younger, smoother and rejuvenated appearance. What Is a LASER and How Does It Work? LASER is an acronym for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. Or according to Merriam-Webster's Medical Dictionary: [: a device that utilizes the natural oscillations of atoms or molecules between energy levels for generating coherent electromagnetic radiation in the ultraviolet, visible, or infrared regions of the spectrum]. Light energy is changed into a tight, intense beam of monochromatic radiation capable of delivering large amounts of power or heat. All lasers possess a lasing cavity consisting of two mirrors placed parallel to each other. One of these mirrors is partially reflective and between these mirrors is a lasing medium or conduit which can be either a gas (CO2 or Halide, etc.), solid (Alexandrite or Ruby) or liquid state. An external power source is directed into this medium, granting energy to the lasing cavity which causes the light amplification process by exciting this medium. From this level of excitation, it may return to its resting state or if it is struck by a photon, releases two photons of the same energy and wavelength in time with one another. Some photons strike other excited atoms and the photons not parallel to the long axis of the cavity are then lost as heat. The small percentage that are given off parallel to the long axis form an energy wave which strike the mirrors and reflects back and forth, back and forth and so on Unlike ordinary light, laser light is collimated, monochromatic (uniform wavelength), coherent (in tune with each other) and uni-directional. Therefore, light striking the epidermis may be reflected, transmitted to deeper tissues, scattered or absorbed. The laser effect occurs when absorbed light is converted to heat, resulting in coagulation of the targeted tissue and depending upon the medium used the particular desired effect is gained. For example, alexandrite for darker tattoos of black or blue ink, black spots, darker hyper-pigment, CO2 for tightening or the epidermis, etc. Here is some info from the Yale Medical University Core Curriculum regarding CO2 laser resurfacing and rhytids. "In a study of 259 patients, Alster et al assessed the efficacy of high-energy pulsed CO2 [: a heavy colorless gas that does not support combustion, dissolves in water to form carbonic acid and is formed esp. in animal respiration and in the decay or combustion of animal and vegetable matter] lasers in treating facial wrinkles. Responses to treatment were assessed at 1, 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks postoperatively. On average, the investigators found a 90% improvement with periorbital [around the eyes] wrinkles most responsive to the therapy (93%). Wrinkles which were more severe and caused by excessive muscle movement such as forehead wrinkles had the least improvement (86%). Persistent erythema [: abnormal redness of the skin due to capillary congestion (as in inflammation)] and hyperpigmentation are the most common complications but these usually resolve after several months. Other potential complications include acne, milia [: a small pearly firm noninflammatory elevation of the skin (as of the face) due to retention of keratin in an oil gland duct blocked by a thin layer of epithelium --called also whitehead;] , dermatitis, infection, and hypertrophic scarring. Most complications are related to postoperative care. Weinstein et al recommend the use of Flexzan, a semiocclusive biosynthetic dressing made from polyurethane foam in the immediate postop period. This is applied after the face is dried and usually changed at 24 hours to remove wound exudate [: exuded matter; esp : the material composed of serum, fibrin, and white blood cells that escapes from blood vessels into a superficial lesion or area of inflammation] . The face should be gently, but thoroughly cleansed with preservative-free tap water and perfume-free cold cream. The face is carefully dried with a cool hair drier or low-energy laser to enable the dressing to stick better. This dressing is left for 7 to 10 days. The patient then showers, washes the hair, and returns to the office with wet dressings which are removed with baby or bath oil. Usually the skin is completely healed. A few small areas may be incompletely healed and will need reapplication of small sections of Flexzan. Antiviral medication is started 24 hours before the procedure while antibiotics are started the morning of the surgery. These are usually continued until reepithelialization [: restoration of epithelium (: a membranous cellular tissue that covers a free surface or lines a tube or cavity of an animal body and serves esp. to enclose and protect the other parts of the body, to produce secretions and excretions, and to function in assimilation) over a denuded area (as a burn site) by natural growth or plastic surgery] is complete. After reepithelialization, the skin should be treated with oil-free, perfume-free cleansers and moisturizers. A tinted titanium dioxide UVA blocking sunscreen should also be used to minimize hyperpigmentation." Yale Medical University Core Curriculum - Lasers YTF! Tip: A good Sunblock that I use after peels is Neova Ti-Silc® 45 tinted sunblock with Copper Peptides -- by Procyte Corporation. I began using this product while on an intensive 9 month Retin A and Hydroquinone regimen. I never burned or hyperpigmented once. I still use it for my daily sunblock. Now that all that garbage is over let's get to what you really want to know. If you had wanted a course on the utilization of LASERS you'd have signed up last semester, right? What Is Laser Resurfacing? Laser resurfacing (or laser peel, laser rejuvenation, laser surgery), is the act of using a carbon dioxide (CO2), erbium, pulse dye or other laser to remove wrinkles, discolorations, age spots, and sun damaged skin or stimulate your body's fibroblasts to form collagen to treat the wrinkle from within. The laser is passed over the treatment area to eradicate wrinkles around the eyes and mouth or anywhere you have unsightly lines, hyperpigmentation or blemishes. Lasers are an effective way to remove those superficial lines that make you appear aged. Plus, laser resurfacing is a considered a safer, less invasive procedure say than deep TCA peels or Dermabrasion. However, laser resurfacing is not for everyone. Resurfacing with a laser is considered ablative and non-ablative lasers are basically thermescent fibroblast stimulators that treat a wrinkle from the inside out rather than literally removing it. Ablate literally means to remove, especially by cutting (laser excision/evaporation included). Non-ablative being that there is no "resurfacing", per se, but rather the heat-induced fibroblast stimulation to thicken the underlying collagen structure. With ablative lasers, the skin surface will appear red and weep afterwards as the top layer(s) has been removed. With the non-ablative there is little downtime, perhaps just a little swelling or pinkness. Available Types Of Lasers There are many types of lasers which address the variety of complaints one may have. Please read below for a sampling of the various machine types on the market. We will, of course, not have every machine listed. Carbon Dioxide Laser (CO2 (including UltraPulse Laser Systems): (technically: carbon dioxide gas lasing device) This is the most common. We will use the CO2 to demonstrate the explanation of the surgery itself. Unfortunately CO2 lasers aren't for everyone. They can be used to eradicate excessive or irregular scarring from a prior procedure although care must be taken when determining a candidate. Hyperpigmentation and hypertrophic scarring may occur in persons who are prone to such or in persons of ethnicity (Italian, Asian, African, African-American, Greek, etc.) Spot test: usually required and strongly suggested. Longevity: If it is for photo-damage or photo-damage induced wrinkles, you will only continue to get photo damage if you frequently subject yourself to UV light exposure or spend a lot of time in the sun without a proper sunblock or hat, etc. Discuss with your surgeon his longevity percentages. Approximate Cost: $1,500 - $6,000.US back to top -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Cool Touch 1320 Laser: (technically: thermescent Nd: YAG 1320 LASER) This is also a selective dermal heating type of procedure such as NLite. This laser supposedly can be used on any skin color, any skin type, and on any part of the body without the risks of hypo- or hyperpigmentation or the healing times associated with conventional lasers. It is considered a non-ablative lasing device. Outer skin and sensitive nerve endings with a unique cooling spray, then use precise laser pulses to stimulate cells called fibroblasts which produce the natural collagen that is the foundation of your skin. As the collagen layer thickens, skin tone and elasticity improve. According to a lecture by Dr. Robert A. Weiss, the assistant professor of dermatology at the University of John Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland by on non-ablative treatments: Thermescent CoolTouch 1320 treatments are usually performed 3-4 times at one month a part although you will not see results until the 2nd or 3rd treatment. Also the improvement may appear immediate although this is due to edema (swelling), etc. The patients sometimes use moist gauze or goggles. It was reported that 50% of the patients opt for an EMLA cream (topical anesthetic). As with NLite, this type of laser delivers the amount of infrared energy to trigger a thermal wound response but without the harmful effects to the epidermis. In other words, the laser heats up where your dermis/epidermis meet, thereby stimulating your collagen production and correcting the rhytids (wrinkles) from within. The difference with CoolTouch 1320 is that the cryogen spray cools the epidermis allowing the penetration of the Nd: YAG to depths of 200-400 microns in the dermis layer with a surface temperature of no more than 44º to 48º Celsius (111.2º to 118.4º Fahrenheit). Improvements were seen on rhytids (wrinkles), acne scars, pore size reduction and "crepiness". Also it was mentioned that the subcision (undermining of scar bands under an acne pock) was beneficial to the patient when treated with the CoolTouch 1320 as well. Spot test: usually required. Longevity: If it is for photo-damage or photo-damage induced wrinkles, you will only continue to get photo damage if you frequently subject yourself to UV light exposure or spend a lot of time in the sun without a proper sunblock or hat, etc. Discuss with your surgeon his longevity percentages in average cases. Approximate Cost: dependant upon area and practice. back to top -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Er:YAG Laser (Erbium): (technically: Erbium: yttrium aluminum garnet) This LASER is at a wavelength of 2940 nm and is absorbed by superficial layers of the epidermis. When Q-switched, the laser is emitted in pulses which evaporates or "blasts" the damaged or unwanted tissue away. The pulsing actually lessens the heat on the skin emitted by the LASER so there is less damage. Spot test: usually required and strongly suggested. Longevity: If it is for photo-damage or photo-damage induced wrinkles, you will only continue to get photo damage if you frequently subject yourself to UV light exposure or spend a lot of time in the sun without a proper sunblock or hat, etc. Discuss with your surgeon his longevity percentages in average cases. Approximate Cost: Approximately $3,000.US for a full face treatment. back to top -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- NLite: (technically: class IV medical, non-ablative HeNe flashlamp pumped, pulsed-dye LASER) ICN Pharmaceuticals' NLite is a class IV medical LASER, specifically designed for non-ablative removal of rhytids (or wrinkles) and collagen rejuvenation. Ablative lasers are more damaging and invasive -- they remove quite a chunk of your skin in order to resurface it - actually removing the wrinkle along with it's surrounding skin. Whereas, the yellow light of NLite passes right through the epidermis without damaging it, thereby stimulating your own dermis to produce its own natural collagen. We have a separate section on this laser so please Click Here for more information on NLite. Spot test: usually required, $75.US Longevity: It is natural collagen and will age like natural collagen -- since this is a newer laser its long term effects are not yet known. However it is believed that you will not have as deep of lines as you would have without ever having the treatment. If it is for photo-damage induced wrinkles, you will only continue to get photo damage if you frequently subject yourself to UV light exposure or spend a lot of time in the sun without a proper sunblock or hat, etc. Discuss with your surgeon his longevity percentages in average cases. Approximate Cost: Approximately anywhere from $800. to $1,800.US for full face and neck. For specific areas, it costs approximately $10.US per pulse with a minimum of $100.US at some offices Approved: The SLS NLite Non-ablative Wrinkle Reduction device was approved by the FDA for use on peri-ocular wrinkles (wrinkles around the eye). Although NLite is used effectively elsewhere. back to top -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- EpiStar Diode Laser System: (technically: infrared diode laser) "The EpiStar Diode Laser System, which can be used to remove hair and to treat vascular and pigmented skin lesions such as birthmarks. The EpiStar system, manufactured by Nidek of Fremont, California, uses an infrared diode laser to treat a 2-millimeter to 5-millimeter area of the skin in a random scanning pattern. The device's thermoelectric cooling system cools the skin to 5 degrees Celsius, protecting the area from heat exposure and minimizing patient discomfort." "Most laser systems use a gas such as carbon dioxide to cool the skin during the procedure, but the EpiStar system does it electronically by blowing cool air onto the skin site... The EpiStar laser includes a touch screen display and interchangeable hand pieces for different treatment sizes." (Reuters - Aug. 2000) Spot test: usually required and strongly suggested. Longevity: permanent, unless you develop another lesion, which has nothing to do with the prior lesion. If it is for photo-damage, you will only continue to get photo damage if you frequently subject yourself to UV light exposure or spend a lot of time in the sun without a proper sunblock or hat, etc. Discuss with your surgeon his longevity percentages. Approximate Cost: dependant upon area and practice. back to top -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Smooth Beam Laser: This is more like CoolTouch Laser than NLite with its miniburst of cryospray to cool the epidermis and the subcutaneous levels before the laser pulse to hinder damage. NLite does not need cryospray and passes harmlessly through the epidermis and subcutaneous levels without pain. It seems that the SmoothBeam must have the cryospray burst or the proteins coagulate and the tissues are damaged - not to mention it is more painful if there is no cryospray. Although technically dissimilar, the Sooth Beam Laser may produce the same type result as the NLite system because of the thermal wound response they create. Spot test: usually required. Longevity: If it is for photo-damage induced wrinkles, you will only continue to get photo damage if you frequently subject yourself to UV light exposure or spend a lot of time in the sun without a proper sunblock or hat, etc. Discuss with your surgeon his longevity percentages. Approximate Cost: dependant upon area and practice back to top -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Dye laser VStar® : (technically: Pulse Dye Laser) Brought to you by Cynosure, this laser isn't exactly a resurfacing laser, it is a laser designed for spider veins, redness, broken capillaries and other types of vascular lesions. This machine is capable of 4 pulse lengths for varying cases. Spot test: usually required. Longevity: unknown, as this is a newer laser -- reportedly permanent Approximate Cost: dependant upon area and practice back to top -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Genica V® (technically: photo-flash lamp-pumped pulsed dye photo laser) Also brought to you by Cynosure, this laser is yet another vascular lesion removal system. A treatment area usually takes under a half an hour. Purpura is apparent after treatment. These bruises will subside within 7-10 days. Patients report "stinging" sensations and seldom need sedation. However, for patients without a high pain threshold tropical anesthetics can be sued. It is reported that the treatment affects depths up to 1,5mm. Spot test: usually required. Longevity: unknown, as this is a newer laser - reportedly permanent Approximate Cost: dependant upon area and practice back to top -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Depilase YAG Laser/"Depilase YAGLASE": (technically: High Power Long Pulse Nd:Yag laser system) Brought to you by Depilase North America, this system was designed to remove both vascular lesions and even hair. The unique factor regarding this laser is that it can be used on dark skin types. Whereas, most other lasers, are contraindicated in some ethnic skin types. Spot test: usually required. Longevity: unknown, as this is a newer laser - reportedly permanent Approximate Cost: dependant upon area and practice Contact Info: DEPILASE North America, LLC Phoenix, AZ Tel. 602.257.4113 Website: http://www.depilase.com back to top -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Q-switched Nd:YAG laser: (wavelength 1064 and 532nm) This laser is manufactured by ConBio. This system can remove general pigmentations and for darker pigments, such as professional tattoos which may be blue or black, may take between 8 and 12 sessions, Longevity: unknown, as this is a newer laser -- reportedly permanent Approximate Cost: dependant upon area and practice. Packages can be bought for more difficult cases - decreasing overall costs to the patient. back to top -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Long-pulsed Nd:YAG laser (VersaPulse®): Manufactured by Coherent, this laser system is also for vascular lesions and has proved very effective in removing such complaints as facial flushing, redness, broken capillaries, telangiectasia (Teel-ann-ject-AZE-yah) which are purple or blue veins on the face, hemangiomas (sacks of red, purple or blue blood vessels resembling a blister, also known as strawberry hemangiomas) and more. Spot test: usually required Longevity: unknown Approximate Cost: dependant upon area and practice back to top -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Eximer laser (including XTRAC™): Brought to you from PhotoMedex. This system is the first FDA approved lasing system beneficial to suffers of Vitiligo and Psoriasis. Sessions may be from 3 to 30 depending upon your case. Visit their website for more information. Spot test: usually required Longevity: unknown Approximate Cost: dependant upon area and practice Contact: Tel: 1-877-44-XTRAC Email: mgensel@PhotoMedex.com Website: http://www.photomedex.com back to top -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Long-pulsed alexandrite laser Apogee 9300®: This laser is brought to you by Cynosure and is specifically for hair removal of the face, neck and other areas. You may need up to 15, averaging at 10 treatments before permanent results are seen. However, permanency has not been reached for leg and the back areas. Spot test: usually required Longevity: unknown Approximate Cost: dependant upon area and practice back to top -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Are You a Candidate For Laser Resurfacing? Not everyone is a candidate for laser resurfacing. If you are prone to keloids, hyper or hypo pigmentation or do not react well to burns or excessive scarring due to minor cuts and abrasion, laser resurfacing is not such a good idea. The laser is a type of burn as it literally evaporates the top layers of skin to reveal younger, tighter skin beneath. If you scar badly when you are burned, the results of laser resurfacing could be disastrous. Also, if you have ethnicity (like Greek, Italian or African American, etc.) in your biological family, you may be prone to hyper or hypo pigmentation resulting from the procedure. An ideal patient would be of white European descent with elastic, non-oily skin. For some ethnic patients, The Erbium, pulse dye and NLite laser is a safer choice although every case is individual and only a qualified surgeon who is very skilled with a LASER can make this diagnosis. NOT just some surgeon who performs Laser resurfacing on a part time basis whenever he can get into the local hospital. Your skin will thank you for it. What to Expect At Your Consultation First and foremost, only choose a surgeon specifically trained in laser resurfacing and who is well-educated on the subject. Not all cosmetic surgeons know how to perform laser surgery. There are techniques to be followed and levels of experience differ with each surgeon. Even if you and the surgeon were to decide to have the procedure performed in-office and an accredited surgery center, find out if he has hospital privileges to perform laser surgery at that accredited hospital. Usually a doctor with hospital privileges to perform such a procedure is well trained and has been thoroughly tested and trained in laser resurfacing. After deciding on a few surgeons you will make an appointments for a consultation. At this consultation you should discuss your expectations and desires and and complaints that you may have. Make sure you give your surgeon full disclosure. This is very important, if you do not alert your surgeon to your specific background. Even if your great great grandmother was Italian you should tell him this. Even though my mother is French and my dad is part German and part Italian, I need to have a spot test behind my ear for laser resurfacing. Even if a person looks pure white European, if they have a trace of ethnicity in their blood, they could develop hyper or hypo pigmentation post-operatively or scar severely from contact with the laser. You will disclose your full medical history and will discuss your realistic expectations. The surgeon should discuss in detail the procedure and its risks and complications and what to expect during the procedure. You will also discuss the available anesthesia that will be used for your procedure. Most Laser Resurfacing procedures are performed under Light Sleep Sedation although some docs may use Local only or even General Anesthesia. Either way, discuss this beforehand. If you do go under General, you make sure that the anesthesiologist is certified! Please read the All About Anesthesia Page. You will discuss what areas should be treated as sometimes only around the eyes, lips and perhaps the forehead will be resurfaced. You will discuss protocol and discuss what to expect post-operatively and how to care for your treatment area. You will also discuss fees and medications. You may take before photos of the area to be treated, but usually this is reserved for a pre-operative visit a few days before the procedure. You may also come to the conclusion that perhaps Dermabrasion or a light chemical peel may be ideal for you instead of laser resurfacing. If you are honest and speak your mind and desires at your consultation, you surgeon will be able to visualize what it is that me or she may do to achieve that. The surgeon may even recommend that you have 2 or 3 sessions instead of a very deep peel all at once. Discuss with your doctor your target depth and downtime you will experience at the different depths as well. Even though you may wish to have a lighter peel for lighter recovery - it may not give you the results that you desire. Preparing For Your Surgery You will be given a pre-operative information packet that explains everything you should do and know before your surgery date. The packet should include all the medications you should not take for up to 2 weeks before your surgery. These medications will include, but are not limited to, aspirin containing products. Would you like to view a typical Medication & Supplements List? Also, your surgeon may or may not advise you of the benefits of Arnica montana for swelling and bruising. Would you like to learn of the benefits of Arnica montana? It is quite possible that you will have preliminary blood work performed. This is normally an extra out-of-pocket expense that the patient must participate in to check your white and red blood cell count (complete blood count, CBC) which ultimately alerts your surgeon to disease or disorders beforehand. So many things to do... so little time. Surgery will be here before you know it so visit the Preparing For Surgery page and relax. This section contains, printer-friendly pre-op lists, tips and advice as well as things you must do to prepare for your big day. How Laser Resurfacing Is Performed Laser resurfacing is normally performed under Light Sleep sedation or Local with a mild intravenous sedation (Valium, Versed, etc.) although, some surgeons use General. The surgeon then passes the laser over the are to be treated. This could take anywhere from a few minutes to an hour and a half for very deep facial or body resurfacing. Unfortunately, some doctors are still making 1 or 2 very deep passes instead of several light passes. This saves them time and money, and personally I think they should be smacked for cutting corners at the expense of a patient. My surgeon informed me of this at my laser resurfacing consultation in July of 2000. He told me that making 1 or 2 deep passes can penetrate very deep leaving a noticeable line where the laser did not pass, i.e. the jaw line and just before the ears and hairline. Very skilled surgeons know to make several light passes resulting in a blended area where the laser did not pass. This way there is no tell-tale obvious line. The laser literally evaporates the targeted areas of skin. It is almost magical as the targeted, damaged skin disappears leaving only a faint trace of smoke and revealing undamaged, pink skin as a result! If you have specific complaints such as lines and wrinkles of the forehead or crow's feet and lip lines. The surgeon will concentrate on these areas a little more for deeper penetration. My surgeon in particular and many others, as well limit the laser's penetration to the epidermis (the uppermost areas of your skin) for the very lightest and medium of peels. Although when the damage is anchored deeper the laser is set to penetrate the upper layers of the reticules dermis. The reticules dermis is the deeper part of the upper most layers -- if that makes any sense.. After the skin resurfacing is complete, your surgeon will cover your face with either a thin film of Bacitracin or antibiotic burn cream like, Silvadine. Some surgeons use a second synthetic breathable skin to protect the newly surfaced tissue during its healing process. EXTRA! A relatively new and exciting burn bandage is made from cotton and purified chitin, called chitosan, (a polysaccharide), which is extracted from the exoskeletons of crustaceans (crab, shrimp and lobster shells). Incidentally, Chitosan is also an ingredient in controversial "fat magnet" pills and supplements. Below is from Youngdeok Chitosan: "Chitosan is a natural product derived from Chitin, a polysaccharide found in exoskeleton of crustacean like crabs and shrimps, in the crusts of the insects like beetles, gold bugs, and grasshoppers, and in the cell wall of bacteria and fungi like molds and mushrooms. Crab's shell consists of Chitin substance, Protein, Calcium carbonate which are all boned together very strongly to become a hard and stable crust. Therefore, pure Chitin (acetylamino-polysaccharide) is extracted by removing protein and calcium carbonate from crab's shell. Through the process of deacetylization called purification, Chitosan (amino-polysaccharide) is obtained from Chitin by getting rid of acetyl radicals. Chitosan-Oligosaccharide is obtained by an enzymatic hydrolysis of chitosan using chitosanase. Compared with Chitin and Chitosan that has poor solubility and absorbability into our body, Chitosan Oligosaccharide is absorbed perfectly. " Some bandages consists of several layers, the main layers consisting of the purified crab shells (chitosan) as well as a synthetic barrier that whisks away moisture and fluids from a weeping, healing wound. An outer layer of cotton gauze absorbs the fluids. The gauze pads can be changed but the synthetic skin and chitosan covering stays to protect the wound. The chitosan are actually absorbed harmlessly into the body and excreted. Miraculously, the crab shells have a superior antibacterial property unheard of in any relative substance. Reportedly, no known fungus or germ can adhere to it's surface. When the bandage is removed, flawless skin appears. The Long Road to Recovery There will be redness and swelling and slight discomfort post-operatively. Your surgeon will have instructed you on the proper care of your treatment area as well as prescribed you the necessary antibiotics and pain medications to help alleviate your discomfort. Take your temperature regularly. An elevated Temperature could mean an infection. Take those antibiotics ON TIME. And don't forget if you are taking birth control that some antibiotics can interfere so in the event that you do have relations, use another form of protection as well. The swelling can be alleviated with ice packs. You really should ice your treatment area (without getting it wet!) for the first 48 hours but not directly on the ski. According to Yale Medical University regarding a facial burn from either Laser or any heat source... "Cooling decreases WBC [:white blood cell] adhesion, increases perfusion [: an act or instance of perfusing; specif : the pumping of a fluid through an organ or tissue], decreases protein denaturation [b : to modify the molecular structure of (as a protein or DNA) esp. by heat, acid, alkali, or ultraviolet radiation so as to destroy or diminish some of the original properties and esp. the specific biological activity], and prevents excess production of thromboxane [: any of several substances that are formed from endoperoxides (: any of various biosynthetic intermediates in the formation of prostaglandins or (: any of various oxygenated unsaturated cyclic fatty acids of animals that have a variety of hormone-like actions (as in controlling blood pressure or smooth muscle contraction)), cause constriction of vascular and bronchial smooth muscle, and promote blood coagulation]. Cooling must occur in the first 30 minutes after the burn.". Yale Medical University Core Curriculum Your healing time totally depends upon the depth of your treatment. You can expect to be down for at least 2 weeks. Your skin will feel like a major sunburn. It may weep and need dressing changes and additional ointments which will be supplied by your doctor directly or by prescription. You will wear these bandages for about 5 to 7 days. You will more than likely have them removed by your doctor on day 5 but this could be longer if the penetration was pretty deep. After your bandages are removed your doctor will go over with you the proper care for your treatment area such as cleansing and applying ointment. You will notice crusty formations and as gross as this sounds DO NOT PICK AT THEM OR PULL THEM OFF! You will scar as a result -- probably more than before your treatment. but, don't worry, they usually subside by day 10. You may be given a bovine mucopolysaccharide ointment or cream, this is a cow-derived cartilage extract that has the anti-inflammatory properties of 1 to 2% hydrocortisone. It accelerates epidermal healing and stimulates the production of prostaglandins and interleukins. The ointment and cream act like a steroid application without the risk of steroid induced atrophy or telangiectasia formation. The product is CX-10 Ointment and CX-5 Correction Cream, manufactured by Donell Inc. in NYC. You will have to use sun block religiously! I am serious, don't mess around! Your skin is very susceptible to damage by UVA/UVB radiation (the sun). That means artificial sunlight like tanning beds as well as just driving to the store or around town all day in your car. Believe it or not you do get sun exposure when you drive around. No using AHA's and Vitamin A and stuff like that either. Your skin is very fragile in its healing stage -- which could last for months! Laserfade Gel Laser Fade contains the same beneficial ingredients as Scar Fade plus a rich blend of antioxidants including Vitamin K, Vitamin E, and Co-Enzyme Q-10.Laser Fade helps reduce the appearance of post laser erythema and scars and creates a soothing micro-membrane which calms inflamed capillaries.Plus, protects skin with an effective hypoallergenic UVA/UVB sunblock SPF15.Apply sparingly twice a day. A small drop is gently massaged onto the skin or scar. Use for eight to twelve weeks or until improvement is no longer noticed. $26.00 Your skin will heal and become very smooth and young looking. The pinkness will subside as will the tenderness. You may be pink for up to 5 months or more, depending on your skin's ability to bounce back. You must take care of your skin in order to keep it looking vibrant and fresh. Although, no procedure can keep your skin from aging -- it can give you a young, relaxed appearance and buy you some time. At about 2 weeks or as soon as there is no weeping and no crusting (but ask your doctor first!) you can safely wear cosmetic to cover the redness. There are special cosmetic one can buy to offset the redness or you can experiment on your own with what you have. Physician's Formula is an inexpensive and effective camouflaging cosmetic line that can be bought in your local pharmacy or drug store. Or you may want to try products specially formulated for tell tale signs of recovery. Risks & Complications Associated with Laser Resurfacing Make sure that your surgeon discusses all of the risks and complications with you at your consultation. There could be allergic reactions to the anesthetic. Just make sure that you disclose your medical history and this is very important -- your nationality. I don't care if you are an eighth of a quarter of a tenth of Italian descent -- let your surgeon know this! I am only about a 1/4 Italian (on my father's side) and I scar horribly from burns. You can slice me to ribbons and I heal normally, I mean I don't get hypertrophic or Keloid scarring but I do have major hyperpigmentation from burns. ANY kind of burn. If you are susceptible to Keloid scarring or have active skin infections or say herpes outbreaks, you are not a good candidate for Laser Resurfacing. If your skin is olive, black or brown and even yellow skin -- take care in your choice of resurfacing measures. Even Dermabrasion and chemical peels can wreak havoc on ethnic skins. You should ask for a "spot test" if you or your doctor are uncertain. You can never be too careful! There is also the risk of bullae (blisters), infection, thicker scar tissue of the treatment area and hypopigmentation as well as hyperpigmentation, as said before. You must also be very careful if you have taken Accutane within the past year and a half (12 to 18 months). The Least You Need To Know What: LASER is an acronym for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. Or according to Merriam-Webster's Medical Dictionary: [: a device that utilizes the natural oscillations of atoms or molecules between energy levels for generating coherent electromagnetic radiation in the ultraviolet, visible, or infrared regions of the spectrum]. There are many types of LASERS, read above for a better understanding. Why: Laser resurfacing (or laser peel, laser rejuvenation, laser surgery), is the act of using a carbon dioxide (CO2), erbium, pulse dye or other laser to remove wrinkles, discolorations, age spots, and sun damaged skin or stimulate your body's fibroblasts to form collagen to treat the wrinkle from within. When: whenever the above complaints exist. Who: Research your doctor very well! Only a qualified surgeon who is very skilled with a LASER can make this diagnosis. NOT just some surgeon who performs Laser resurfacing on a part time basis whenever he can get into the local hospital. Your skin will thank you for it. Where: Accredited Surgical suite or hospital Risks: READ THEM! incisions/scars: no incisions, but scars and irregularities are possible. Anesthesia: local with oral sedation, IV Sedation (Light Sleep) or General. Read All About Anesthesia Duration: few minutes to an hour and a half for very deep facial or body resurfacing. Pain Factor: mild to moderate, pain meds should alleviate any discomfort. If not, call your surgeon immediately! Swelling: Mild to moderate -- depending upon individual; I suggest arnica montana and bromelain. Bruising: Mild, more redness than anything -- depending upon the individual; I suggest arnica montana and bromelain. Post-operative instructions: Have someone there to help care for you during your recovery, keep elevated -- even when sleeping. A recliner works best. Please read above for more information, aftercare for laser surgery is very important! 1st Post-op visit: possibly the next day, depends upon depth, extent of work, aftercare protocol and surgeon. 2nd Post-op visit: depends Return to work: at least two weeks for standard or major resurfacing. For lighter procedures a week, and for some like NLite, the next day. Activity: No exercise until at least 3 weeks post-operative for standard and even minor work. Be careful not to raise your blood pressure for several weeks, you don't want to inhibit proper healing or get an infection. Check with your surgeon! Sun exposure: You will have to use sun block religiously. I am serious, don't mess around. Your skin is very susceptible to damage by UVA/UVB radiation (the sun). That means artificial sunlight like tanning beds as well as just driving to the store or around town all day in your car. Believe it or not you do get sun exposure when you drive around. No using AHA's and Vitamin A and stuff like that either. Your skin is very fragile in its healing stage -- which could last for months. End result: 3 months to a year. Sounds like a long time huh? Well. Loss of Sensitivity: It is possible to lose sensation. Long term or permanent loss of sensitivity is possible. Anything else? Possible eyebrow and eyelash loss from medications. Possible permanent hyper or hypopigmentation, redness or shininess. Longevity: depending upon your habits and sun exposure. Stay out of the sun if you want to keep the results longer. But Wait! There's More! Visit other sites, this is your life! Research as much as you can on the subject. Disclose all your medical background. If you are a smoker, if you are taking medications, or if you have any other medical concerns. Be realistic in your expectations. NO plastic surgeon can perform miracles, he can only try and improve upon what you have beforehand. The average prices for a laser resurfacing: $1,500 - $6,000.
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Were you treated by a doctor that wasn't a dermatologist or plastic surgeon? A reporter for Glamour is looking for real stories about cosmetic treatments from physicians working outside of their practice—dentists doing Botox, gynos doing laser hair removal, family docs opening up medspas, and more. If anyone has had complications (droopy eyelid, burns) from such a doctor, please use this form with your story ASAP!
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I had a laser treatment on my face this past Friday. I have an appointment to get a Fractional on my face this Friday. Is it too soon?
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Friday after noon I had a laser treatment. This Friday I'm scheduled for a Fractional treatment. Is it too soon?
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I just had the active fx treatment today. I didn't do any research before-hand, but wasn't too worried as I have had other laser treatments before. I am now really nervous after reading all of these posts and hearing about many of the potential poblems. My face is red and is still burning after almost three hours. I have a million little brown dots all over my face, which look very strange. I will go to the pharmacy tonight to get some gentle cleansers and lotions. I am about to apply the cool compress to my face. Hopefully that will keep the swelling down.
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Does anyone know if you can do the Active FX and the deep fx if you've had silicone fillers?
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can anyone recommend a doctor in south jersey that performs activefx laser? i am considering the procedure, but can only find 1 doctor who performs this, but there are no reviews posted. i had a few fraxel treatments done last year. i think i have more wrinkles,and a rougher complexion than i did before i had the treatments. if anyone has any info., please let me know.
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